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Seattle’s Broadway Farmers' Market to Remain Open Year-Round

Seattle’s Broadway Farmers' Market to Remain Open Year-Round


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The beloved market will now be open every Sunday

The market has been around since 2004.

The Seattle Broadway Farmers' Market, located at Broadway Avenue East and East Pine Street, has traditionally taken a hiatus between the months of January and March. But according to Capitol Hill Seattle, the beloved farmers' market will now stay open all year-round, selling fresh produce, cheese, bread, flowers, and artisanal products every Sunday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The market, which is held at Seattle Central Community College, has been in operation since 2004, and features a wide selection of seasonal produce from Eastern Washington and Puget Sound, as well as farmstead cheeses, baked goods, pasture-raised meats, flowers, honey, seafood, and eggs.

They’ve also released their Holiday Gift and Eating Guide, which lays out everything that they’ll have available throughout the holiday season and helps you plan your meals. You can create gift baskets as well as handmade wreaths, and gift certificates are available for this farmers' market as well as any of the seven markets in the Neighborhood Farmers' Market Alliance.


Seattle Farmers Market Roundup

While the sun-kissed days of summer may be behind us, many of Seattle’s farmers markets are still in full swing, and are bursting with beautiful fall produce and all sorts of other treasures. I took the liberty of visiting these markets one-by-one to check out the goods, and here’s what I found.

University District Farmers Market

Location: University Way NE (the “Ave”) between 50th & 52nd
Hours: Saturdays 9-2
What stood out: Appel Farms, a family-run dairy farm in Ferndale, Washington, had an impressive lineup of tasty handmade cheeses, with flavors ranging from jalapeño gouda to Greek olive feta to bacon cheddar!
Tip: This is a sizable market with tons and tons of beautiful produce. Take a lap before deciding which booth to buy from! Also, if you’re planning on stopping for lunch (or even if you’re not), stop for a naan at Tandoozy. Just trust me on this one.

Capitol Hill Broadway Farmers Market

Location: Broadway Ave E & E Pine St
Hours: Sundays 11-3
What stood out: As a Cap Hill resident and regular market-goer, it’s hard to play favorites with this one, but I will say that the Malus Ginger Beer I tasted for the first time last week was phenomenal, and the folks serving it were just as lovely. Steel Wheel Farm and El Chito (delicious tamales) are other favorites.
Tip: If you’re there on a nice day, pick up picnic makings (fresh fruit, bread, cheese…even wine and smoked salmon can be found!) and walk a block east to Cal Anderson park to enjoy your goodies!

West Seattle Farmers Market

Location: California Ave SW & SW Alaska, in the heart of the West Seattle Junction
Hours: Sundays 10-2
What stood out: Growing Washington has a great selection of produce. I also know several folks who are part of their Food Box delivery program and love it. For prepared food, I highly recommend trying a toasty empanada at Pampeana. I went for the Spinach & Cheese variety and it was dreamy.
Tip: This is a fairly small market if you have time to kill after making your way through the vendor booths, take a stroll along California Avenue. Pop into Pegasus Book Exchange, grab a pastry at Bakery Nouveau, or browse vinyl at Easy Street Records.

Ballard Farmers Market

Location: Ballard Avenue NW, between Vernon Place NW and 22nd Avenue NW
Hours: Sundays 10-3
What stood out: It was fascinating talking with the folks at Farmbox Greens, who have taken on the complex challenge of vertical urban farming. Their gorgeous microgreens are delicate and delicious, and there is much to learn from the knowledgable owner!
Tip: While you’re in Ballard, take a tour of the many breweries nearby. NW Peaks Brewery, Lucky Envelope Brewing, and Stoup Brewing are all worth a visit.

Bonus: Vashon Island Farmers Market

Although this market is a ferry ride away from the city, I’d highly recommend stopping by if you’re ever on the island, or are looking for a fun day trip. Also note that this market stops running between December and April.
Location: 17519 Vashon Highway SW
Hours: Saturdays 10-2 (April through December) plus Wednesdays 3-6 (June-September)
What stood out: Perhaps my favorite sample of the day (and there were many) was provided by Seattle Canning Co. Their Tomato Relish and Spicy Eggplant Kasundi (chutney) are both to die for.
Tip: Bring the little ones! This is a super kid-friendly market, with face painting, live music, and plenty of space to spread a blanket out on the grass!

As you can see, Seattle’s farmers market scene is still bustling, even with the weather turning colder. Enjoy exploring the bounty our beautiful region has to offer, and take the time to meet the people behind the magic! The farmers, cooks, craftsmen, and business owners behind the booths LOVE sharing their story!


A Guide to Farmers Markets in Seattle

When I travel, I love to try new food and restaurants, something I wouldn’t (or couldn’t) get at home, with the added bonus of no dishes! But sometimes it’s nice to have a home cooked a meal in your comfy pj’s after a day out exploring a new place. ​At home, many of us already shop at a local farmers market, why not when you’re on vacation? A new place means new farmers and artists, and is there a better way to get fresh, organic produce, meat, and seafood than to get it right from the source? I think not .

While staying in downtown Seattle, you have dozens of options for dining out within just walking distance. While your inner foodie may be craving to try all the local fare downtown has to offer (and have someone else do the cooking), why not put that fully stocked kitchen to use during your stay and check out some of our local farmers markets? It will not only give you a chance to discover some of Seattle’s eclectic neighborhoods, it will also give you an opportunity to find some of the freshest seasonal ingredients as well as support local farmers and artisans. You can pick up some of the freshest produce in town, enjoy a slice of piping hot wood-fired pizza or even take home some local honey or wine as gifts from your visit to Seattle. With so many vendors and so many markets, you’re sure to be in store for a fun day of eating, shopping and culinary adventures! Check out the markets closest to the downtown area:

Address: Broadway Ave E. & E. Pine Street

Open Monday through Sunday, Year Round

Hours: Crafts Market: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Farm Tables: 8 a.m. – 4 p.m., Merchant Hours: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., Restaurants: 6 a.m. – 1:30 a.m. (varies)

Address: 1st Ave and Pike St.

Address: California Avenue SW & SW Alaska St., West Seattle Junction

If you have a car, or are up for an adventure a little further from home base, here is a complete calendar of all the local farmers markets happening within our lovely city:

Address: Ballard Avenue NW, between Vernon Place & 22 nd Avenue NW

Open Wednesdays, May 8 th to October 9

Address: 37 th Ave. S. & S. Edmunds St., just off Rainier Ave S. in South Seattle

Address: 3410 Evanston Avenue N

Open Thursdays, June 6 th to October 3 rd

Address: NE 125 th & 28 th NE, just off Lake City Way next to the Library

Open Saturdays, June 1 st to November 23rd

Address: 33 rd Avenue W. & W. McGraw St, in Magnolia Village

Open Fridays, June 7 th to September 27 th

Address: N. 67 th St. & Phinney Ave N., upper lot at Phinney Neighborhood Center

Open Thursdays, May 30 th to Mid-October

Address: W. Crockett St. & Queen Anne Avenue N.

Open Saturdays, Year Round

Address: University Way NE (between 50 th & 52 nd St.)

Open Wednesdays, May 15 th to Mid-September

Address: Meridian Avenue N. & N. 50 th St., in Meridian Park

Home Cooking in Seattle

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Your Guide to Seattle's Farmers Markets

A flurry of farmers markets are opening right now, so it's prime time to tuck a basket under your arm, peruse the stalls, and scoop up a bounty of fresh seasonal produce and artisanal products. Below, we've rounded up all of Seattle's markets for your planning needs. For more ideas, check out our food & drink calendar.

Stay in the know! Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app (available for iOS and Android), or delivered to your inbox.

Note: Vendors may vary based on seasonal availability.

Capitol Hill Broadway Farmers Market
Sundays, year-round
11 am-3 pm

At the year-round Broadway market, pick up some New York-style boiled bagels and pillowy baked Chinese buns from Bagels and Baos, or sample small-batch drinking vinegars from the Shrubbery.

Columbia City Farmers Market
Wednesdays, May 9-Oct 10
3-7 pm

Grab a cone of Sweet Bumpas ice cream from former Poppy pastry chef Matt Bumpas, pupusas from Lily's Salvadorean, or farm-to-table Indian street food from Tandoozy.

Lake City Market
Thursdays, June 7-Oct 4
3-7 pm

Located next to Albert Davis Park, this seasonal market also features free parking in an underground garage and has live music and activities for kids most Thursdays. Nosh on South-Carolina-meets-Filipino fare from Kiss My Grits, try creative flavors like chocolate Earl Grey and Persian rose from Sweet Alchemy Ice Cream, and taste German baked goods from Kaffeeklatsch.

Magnolia Farmers Market
Saturdays, June 2-Oct 20
10 am-2 pm (except Aug 5)

Patty Pan Cooperative will sling their handmade tortillas and quesadillas, El Chito will sell their authentic tamales, and Girl Meets Dirt will purvey heritage jams and preserves.

Phinney Farmers Market
Fridays, June 1-Sept 28
3:30-7:30 pm

The Phinney Market will feature incredible sourdough from Sea Wolf Bakers, small-batch ice cream from Bluebird Ice Cream, and ooey-gooey raclette cheese from Fire and Scrape, among other delicious things.

West Seattle Farmers Market
Sundays, year-round
10 am-2 pm

The year-round West Seattle market presents falafel and pitas from Falafel Salam, Southern-style, hickory-smoked meats from Girls Gone BBQ, and delectable confections from Jonboy Caramels.

University District Farmers Market
Saturdays, year-round
9 am-2 pm

Find local preserves from Ayako & Family Jams, gluten-free treats from Nuflours, and flaky pastry stuffed with fillings from Pampeana Empanadas at the year-round U-District market.

City Hall Farmers Market
Tuesdays, May 29-Oct 9
10 am-2 pm

This Pike Place satellite market will feature dreamy Greek yogurt from Ellenos granola, baked goods, and dog treats from the Brewmaster's Bakery and pickled vegetables from Seattle Pickle Co.

Denny Regrade Farmers Market
Tuesdays, May 29-Sept 25
10 am-2 pm

The Regrade satellite market from Pike Place will offer biscuits from Honest Biscuits, kombucha and tea from Shen Zen Tea, and artisan crepes from La Crespella.

South Lake Union Farmers Market
Thursdays, May 31-Oct 11
10 am-2 pm

At this Pike Place satellite market, you'll find mushrooms and microgreens from Fat Cat Mushrooms, local honey from Backyard Bees, and homemade ice cream from Silver Springs Creamery.

First Hill Farmers Market
Fridays, June 1-Sept 28
10 am-2 pm

First Hill's Pike Place satellite market has Grimm Brothers hot sauce, fresh berries from Hayton Berries Farms, and orchard fruit from Martin Family Orchards.

Pike Place Farmers Market
Saturdays, June-Nov
9 am-5 pm

Of course, Pike Place Market is open every day year-round, but during peak season you can also find this satellite market with fresh produce and artisan goods on Saturdays, located on the cobblestones at Pike Place and Pine Street.

Wallingford Farmers Market
Wednesdays, May 16-Sept 26
3-7 pm

Recognized by the Washington Farmers Markets Association as the best farmers market in 2013, this outdoor market has handmade craft sodas from Soda Jerk Sodas, rustic baked goods and granola from Salmonberry Goods, and cider from Finnriver Farm and Cidery. There's also a park, playground, and community garden P-patch to enjoy.

Ballard Farmers Market
Sundays, year-round
10 am-3 pm

The first Seattle market to offer produce exclusively from Washington farmers, this year-round market has small-batch granola from Marge Granola, gourmet popsicles from Seattle Pops, and naturally fermented pickles from Britt's Pickles.

Madrona Farmers Market
Fridays, May 18-Oct 12
3-7 pm

Madrona's market features locally sourced craft beer from Tin Dog Brewing, berries from Sidhu Farms, and mead from Hierophant Meadery.

Queen Anne Farmers Market
Thursdays, June 7-Oct 11
3-7:30 pm

This market, which is the only independent farmers market in Seattle, features a carefully curated lineup of Washington farmers, fishers, foragers, brewers, winemakers, artisan food and street food vendors, and rotating food trucks, including beer from Lowercase Brewing, kombucha from Seattle Kombucha Company, ramen and tacos from Brothers & Co, and more. There's also live music, kids' activities, and chef demos.

Stay in the know! Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app (available for iOS and Android), or delivered to your inbox.


Grilled Radicchio with Creamy Cheese

Serves: 4 as a side dish | start to finish: 20 minutes

Local Roots Farm in the Snoqualmie Valley grows outstanding Treviso radicchio and sells at the Broadway Farmers’ Market year round. You can also make this recipe with Chioggia or Verona radicchio (rounder varieties), although the longer Treviso may be easier to grill.

2 heads Treviso radicchio, about 7 ounces (200 grams) each
Olive oil
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper
2 and 1/2 ounces (75 grams) creamy cow’s milk cheese, such as
Normandy Camembert, Pierre Robert, or Brillat-Savarin
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

Cut the radicchio heads into quarters and drizzle with olive oil, turning to lightly coat the pieces. Season with salt and pepper. Heat a gas grill to medium, or set a heavy cast-iron pan over medium heat. When it is hot, add the radicchio and cook, turning often, until it is soft, brown in color, and lightly charred, about 12 minutes. Cut the cheese into pieces.

Transfer the radicchio to a serving dish. Top with pieces of the cheese and sprinkle with the balsamic vinegar. The heat of the radicchio will melt the cheese.

Variations: Grill, drizzle with the balsamic vinegar and more olive oil, and serve with Serrano ham and fresh figs.

Try the recipe with Belgian endive, using lemon juice instead of balsamic vinegar.

From Bitter: a Taste of the World’s Most Dangerous Flavor, with Recipes, written by Jennifer McLagan and photographed by Aya Brackett, reprinted with permission of Ten Speed Press.


A thought or two to lick by: some markets are bigger than others, so it be-woofs you to consider your dog’s temperament before bringing him to a crowded market. Leashes are required for all doggo visitors, and poop bags are a no-brainer, too. Finally, per the Governor’s mandate, please make sure you are wearing a mask at all times, and stay socially distant.

Sniff out dates, hours, and more for the 2021 Seattle farmers market season.

Ballard Farmers Market

Sundays 9 a.m.-2 p.m. year-round

Year-round, rain or shine. That’s the Ballard Farmers Market motto. The first Seattle market to offer produce exclusively from local farmers, there’s more fruit, vegetables, meat, pasta, kombucha, and local yogurt than you can shake a stick at (and that’s just fur starters). Make sure to stop by Porter’s Pride, a dedicated food ‘n treat stand for dogs.

Queen Anne Farmers Market

Thursdays 3-7:30 p.m., June 3-Oct. 14

Seattle’s only independent, community-run farmers market, Queen Anne welcomes vendors of all kinds: farmers, fishers, foragers, winemakers, beer makers, and everything in between. Its rotating food truck attendees also make it a pawfect lunch date option. For a cool canine treat, look for the Seattle Pops stand, which offers Puppy Pops for dogs!

Columbia City Farmers Market

Wednesdays 3-7 p.m., May 12-Oct. 13

The Columbia City Farmers Market brings almost 40 vendors from across the state together, along with a nose-lickin’-good assortment of small food vendors, including Seattle Pops. It’s a large farmers market with space for families to spread out while shopping.

Fremont Sunday Market

Sundays 10 a.m.-4 p.m., year-round

This one’s for those who love sniffin’ out a good find. Fremont Sunday Market offers more than just food, thought it has plenty of that, too. One-of-a-kind art, collectible antiques, world imports, and artisan crafts are just a few other items you’ll find at this unique market.

Magnolia Farmers Market

Saturdays 10 a.m.-2 p.m., June 5-Sept. 25

For deluxe jams, reasonably-priced berries, and natural meats, sniff out this one-block farmers market in Magnolia. If your canine companion isn’t a fan of large crowds, this market might be a compromise that’ll let you shop and keep your four-legged friend’s tail waggin’.

Capitol Hill Broadway Farmers Market

Sundays 11 a.m.-3 p.m., year-round

If fresh produce is the name of your game, Capitol Hill Broadways Farmers Market is the VIP. With fewer artsy-craftsy stalls and more vendors selling local fruits, veggies, breads, soups, and flowers, this market’ll bring the yum to your Sunday all year long.

University District Farmers Market

Saturdays 9 a.m.-2 p.m., year-round

Located in the heart of UW, the University District Farmers Market boasts a wide variety of fresh fruits, vegetables, and baked goods. Must-tries include homemade soup and kombucha on tap.

West Seattle Farmers Market

Sundays 10 a.m.-2 p.m., year-round

Located on the stretch of California Ave. that’s home to a bookshop, a record store, and other local faves, the West Seattle Farmers Market is your one-stop shop for fresh produce and beer and wine tastings.

Lake City Farmers Market

Thursdays from 3-7 p.m., July 1-Sept. 23

Lake City is a small, tight-knit community, and its farmers market is, too. Vibrant berries, fresh flowers, meats, raw honey, and pesto mozzarella are just a few of the T-R-E-A-T-S you can fetch from vendors.

Sidewalk Dog’s mission is to help dog parents spend more time with their puppers by discovering and sharing activities they can do and places they can go—together! Sniff out our award-winning newsletter and Instagram, then check us out on Facebook and Twitter.


Capitol Hill Cooks | Salted caramel ice cream inspired by 10th/Pine (+made with fork, pan)

I always thought that you needed an ice cream maker to make ice cream. Not so! I&rsquom not saying this recipe is a completely casual undertaking, given the daredevil feat of making a dark amber caramel. But once that’s done, all you need are a pan and a fork and a bit of freezer space to produce a perfectly creamy scoop of Molly Moon’s salted caramel ice cream at home.

I remember a time, not so long ago, when it was more difficult to stumble across an ice cream shop on Capitol Hill. Hard to believe, maybe, now that they seem to be on every corner, but it&rsquos true. I imagine that all of you began making your own ice cream at home in those dark days, as did I, and I see no reason to stop just because we now have so many excellent ice cream purveyors in the neighborhood. As everyone knows, there&rsquos no such thing as too much ice cream.

Luckily, just in time for summer, the new Molly Moon&rsquos Homemade Ice Cream cookbook makes this salted caramel recipe, and many others, available to home cooks on Capitol Hill and beyond. The book has all the classic and quirky flavors you’ve come to expect of Molly Moon&rsquos. Scout mint? Check. Baby beet sorbet? Indeed. Honey lavender? Oh, yes.

But salted caramel is the shop’s iconic flavor, far and away the most popular. And after making a batch of it this week, I was reminded of why it&rsquos such an enduring favorite. (Not YOUR favorite yet? A perk of making it at home is that you can control the darkness of the caramel and the amount of salt. I highly recommend following the recipe as written, but nobody will know if you want to dial it down a bit in the privacy of your own home.) So whether you have a fancy ice cream maker or just a fork, this recipe is for you. Salted caramel ice cream for the masses.

Salted Caramel Ice Cream
Adapted from Molly Moon&rsquos Homemade Ice Cream (makes 1 to 1 ½ qts.)

1/8 tsp. freshly-squeezed lemon juice
1 ½ c. sugar
1 Tb. butter
3 c. heavy cream
1 c. whole milk
1 Tb. kosher salt

Have your ingredients measured and beside the stove before you start making your caramel (except for the salt, which you add later). Put the lemon juice in a light-colored, heavy-bottomed pot and turn the heat to medium-high. Add the sugar ¼ c. at a time, stirring each addition with a wooden spoon until it dissolves completely into liquid. (Some of the sugar may crystalize on the side of your pot, just ignore it.) When all the sugar is added and dissolved, continue to cook, watching like a hawk and stirring occasionally for about 4-6 minutes. During this time, the sugar will caramelize and the color will change from a light golden to a dark amber hue (it may also begin to smoke a bit). Use your eyes, nose, and good sense to decide when you have achieved a dark-but-not-burnt caramel, and immediately lower the heat to medium-low as you trade your wooden spoon for a whisk and whisk in the butter.

When the butter has melted, begin to add the cream and milk verrrry sloooowly. Seriously, slowly. The caramel will steam and bubble and some hard little caramel lumps may form. No worries, keep whisking, be patient, let them dissolve. When the mixture is smooth, remove it from the heat. Pour it into a shallow pan and refrigerate until thoroughly chilled, at least an hour.

Remove the cold creamy pan of deliciousness from the refrigerator and whisk in 1 Tb. (yes, 1 Tb.) kosher salt. Process in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturer&rsquos instructions (I churned mine longer than a usual batch, about 35 minutes, because the salt makes this ice cream so soft). Or if you don&rsquot have an ice cream maker (or if it&rsquos busy churning another flavor already), leave the mixture in the pan and transfer the pan to the freezer. If you&rsquore going the no-ice-cream maker route, stir the mixture thoroughly with a fork every half hour or so until the entire pan of ice cream is a uniform texture (at first it will freeze around the edges, then you will stir it up, then it will freeze around the edges again, etc.).

When your ice cream is ready (it will still be quite soft), transfer it to a sealed freezer container and freeze at least four hours before serving. This ice cream never freezes very hard because of the salt content, so plan to serve and eat it quickly!

Note 1: I thought that the saltiness of this ice cream was perfect. If you find the finished product too salty-tasting, however, serve it over a rich brownie or under a blanket of hot fudge. Now it&rsquos perfect, right?

Note 2: This magic no-ice-cream-maker method works better with this recipe than with others I&rsquove tried it with. Just a heads up in case you plan to use this method with other recipes: it always works, but usually the texture of ice cream made with the fork-and-pan system is icier/grainer than ice cream made with an ice cream maker. With this recipe, however, the results were indistinguishable.


Restaurant Shifts and Shakeups: Week of June 17

OPENINGS

Roux will be serving beignets all day starting in August.

Peaks Frozen Yogurt Bar: Issaquah
The froyo joint expanded to Issaquah on Friday with a grand opening that included prize giveaways and an officiating ceremony with the Issaquah mayor. The new location is self-serve with 14 rotating flavors, and an extensive list 100 toppings and sides including fresh fruits and freshly baked waffle cones.

Li'l Woody's Ballard
The Capitol Hill burger shop opened a second location in Ballard earlier this week, taking over what used to be Zak’s Burger’s joint. The menu has those same specialty burgers and crack fries, but the larger interior includes a full-on Molly Moon’s Ice Cream operation. And even better, the new Li'l Woody's has outdoor seating and longer hours from 11am to 11 pm for late night munchies.

Walrus Beer Garden
Phinneywood has news of the grand opening of the beer garden at Naked City Brewery and Taphouse on Friday. The outdoor seating area, which was formerly a vacant parking lot, is adjacent to the brewery at 8564 Greenwood Ave N and is officially called Walrus Beer Garden in honor of the famous Walrus Tavern that occupied the site before it burned down.

Old Ballard Liquor Company
The distillery softly opened on Thursday at 4421 Shilshole Ave NW, according to the Ballard News Tribune. While the company doesn’t plan to start selling alcohol until at least three more weeks, Old Ballard will focus on "bounce liqueurs"—a type of drink that infuses fruit into brandy, rum, or whiskey and requires at least six months of aging.

Mighty Ramen
According to CHS, chef Rob Tallon is bringing authentic ramen to the Broadway Farmers Market this Sundaty. Mighty Ramen's menu has three food options and rotating special drinks with prices ranging from $6-8.

Chabela’s Bar and Grill
Wallyhood has word the Mexican neighborhood joint in Wallingford quietly closed its doors sometime this month. Customers reported unanswered calls and locked doors at the bar.

Carmelita
After 17 years of business, the Phinney Ridge favorite willclose in September. The vegetarian restaurant's owners have recently sold the business to local restaurant owners who will not be carrying on the vegetarian tradition. Kathryn Neumann, Carmelita’s owner says the restaurant will go out with a bang, with periodic summer celebrations and special offers. “Of course it’s difficult to say goodbye, but we have one last glorious summer to bid everyone adieu.” Keep an eye on Carmelita’s website or Facebook page for more details on upcoming events.

Copper Gate
The delightfully divey, Scandanvian-themed restaurant and bar in Ballard will close on July 1 and will hold celebration events everyday from 5 until closing. The place has been sold to new owners who have a different name and vision planned for the venue.

Chutneys Grille on the Hill
Another Capitol Hill construction project begins soon, and Chutneys is the latest restaurant to feel the pressure, CHS reports. The neighborhood Indian restaurant had its final run this week after a year long, presumably unsuccesful, search for a new lease.

COMING SOON

Parfait Ice Cream
The wildly popular ice cream truck will be setting up shop at its own brick-and-mortar location at 2034 NW 56th in Ballard. The extra space will allow Parfait’s owner, Adria Shimada, to produce more ice cream-meets-patisserie creations, including hand-dipped ice cream bars, push pops, and housemade sodas. Shimada is planning for an August opening with hours from noon to 11pm every day.

Stoneburner
James Weimann and Deming Maclise are on the verge of opening their grand new establishment on Ballard Ave. Have a look around.

Bar Cantinetta
The popular Wallingford and Bellevue ristorante will be opening a smaller sibling restaurant in Madison Valley in late July. Bar Cantinetta will be taking over the longtime La Côte space at 2811 E Madison St. The owners say the new location will be cozier than its sibling locations and will serve lunch and brunch to be consistent with La Côte’s former hours.

Dulces Latin Bistro
The owners of the former Madrona (and downtown) Dulces are reviving their bistro in Capitol Hill, says CHS. After negotiations for a different Capitol Hill location fell through in 2011 and a short run on Western, Dulces has found a home inside the Lawrence Lofts project at 19th and Madison.

Roux
Where Ya At Matt food truck owner, Matthew Lewis has announced his New Orleans-inspired restaurant will open in August. Lewis will be serving up a Creole food with Northwest ingredients. Roux’s menu includes beignets, grits, gumbo, and po’boys.

Le Zinc
The French restaurant, a sibling to Maximilien in Pike Place Market, will open on June 24 (fingers crossed!) on the corner of 15th and Pine. The restaurant will feature a Parisian-style absinthe fountain, an abundance of Penn Cove mussels, house-churned butter and room for 70 people. Have a look around.

Bad Jimmy’s Brewing Company
The Ballard Brewery is aiming for a late-July or early-August opening and have begun a $13,000 Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for brewing equipment, My Ballard says. Once Bad Jimmy’s formally opens at 4358 Leary Way, the owners plan to distribute a variety of strong brews, including an Irish Strong and a Black IPA. Hours will be from noon to midnight Sunday-Thursday and noon-2am Friday and Saturday.

ADDRESS REVEALS

Le Caviste
Much adored former Le Gourmand sommelier David Butler confirmed his upcoming French wine bar will be housed downtown at 1919 Seventh Avenue. The Stranger reports Le Caviste will open sometime in the fall.

Heaven Sent Ice Cream
Ezell Stephens, owner of Heaven Sent Fried Chicken has converted his legendary dessert recipes into ice cream. With the help of Full Tilt Ice Cream’s flagship in White Center, Ezell was able to tweak his sweet potato pie, bread pudding, and peach cobbler into cold and creamy goodness. The ice creams are available at all Heaven Sent locations for $6.25 a pint.

Blackboard Bistro Brunch
According to West Seattle blog, Blackboard Bistro is now open for Sunday brunch from 9:30am -2pm. Dinner hours will stay the same from 5-9pm on Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday evenings and 5-10pm on Friday and Saturday nights.

Homegrown
The popular sandwich shop shook up its menu this week, just in time for summer. Homegrown now offers a summer seasonal sandwich, topped with roasted eggplant, zucchini, radishes, avocado, raw-milk swiss, yellow pepper relish, and tomatoes. A new side salad is now available for $4. Plus, some momentous news: the shop will no longer charge extra for their homemade gluten-free bread.

Hunger
July marks the Fremont restaurant's third anniversary (though it's only been in its spacious new digs since last year). Every night next month, the restaurant will offer a special menu of $3 items (Champagne, sangria, beers, bacon-wrapped dates with valdeon (aka a Spanish blue cheese) ice cream. Another monthlong celebratory deal: A three-course dinner with wine pairings for $33 a person.

CHANGE OF PLANS

Bill’s Off Broadway
Construction on the building restoration project on the property housing Bill’s off Broadway has moved slower than anticipated, CHS says. Instead of running its 20-month hiatus at the beginning of July, Bill’s off Broadway will remain open until at least November 30. Bill’s on Greenwood will still open on September 1, as planned.


Seattle’s Broadway Farmers' Market to Remain Open Year-Round - Recipes

Pandemic Update:

  • The Ballard Sunday Market is open (with a safety plan), and Brookfield Farm is selling there. This apiary is a treasure, offering unusual honeys from around the state. As stated on her website, she appreciates pre-orders. Look at the list of honeys &mdash so many interesting ones! I've tried the ones from K Brothers in the past, but there are some others listed there I hadn't seen.
  • Shoreline Central Market has had a recent supply of Craic honey from the Yakima Valley. This is one of my favorites. It's dark, and I describe it as "root-beer-ish". Look up! It's on the top shelf where it belongs. Also they have a fantastic "Fair Trade" honey that Oregon's Glory Bee sourced from Uruguay: it tastes something like dried fruit and then goes floral. Glory Bee prints the source country in small print on the label - years ago they had one from Brazil that I loved.
  • Chef Shop on Elliott Ave. has a bunch of honeys I hadn't seen before, including a couple of amazing ones from Sardinia that they had shipped directly from the island. As always, Chef Shop has the best collection of imported honeys, and now they also have good honey from Oregon.
  • Sunny Honey, near the donuts and the fish-throwers at Pike Place Market, is open. Last I was there I got one of their few remaining jars of Moses Lake Wildflower, and they have a very fruity Cranberry Blossom honey from southwest Washington.
  • Honey Hole Honey in Ballard pulled some good honey this year - I'm not sure if any is left, but you might be able to arrange a pickup by messaging on Facebook.

There is plenty of raw honey to be found in the Seattle area, if you know where to look. Rather unfortunately, it’s harder to get your hands on fresh, local raw honey than it is to find imported honeys from around the world. You need to haunt the farmers markets, since few major stores stock honey from the smaller local apiaries, which by definition have inconsistent product. Pro tip: at the markets, not only the honey sellers have honey many farms will have bees for pollination and sometimes get leftover honey from it. Look at all the produce tables. You might find something unusual.


Seattle’s Broadway Farmers' Market to Remain Open Year-Round - Recipes

By regularly visiting your flea or farmers markets you will likely be supporting your local economy, environment, and the small farm families that take great pride in the bounties of the Earth they produce.

Like them, you too will reap what you sow when you resurrect and cultivate the wise and frugal bygone era family tradition of practicing a weekly "Market Day" in your Washington town.

There you will find links to other state directories as well as lists of useful insiders' advice that will help you get the most bang for your buck at your local Washington greenmarkets.

You will come away with a much better understanding of why buying locally grown organic food is one of the most frugal, eco-friendly, and healthy things a family can do.

You will also learn why your local fresh markets are at the top of the list of family-friendly cheap and fun things to do in Washington.

I have tried to make your local Washington Scavenger hunt as easy as possible by providing the following information for all the major Farmers Markets in WA:

  1. Washington Farmers Market Name
  2. Market Address
  3. Washington County
  4. Washington Farmers Market Contact Information
  5. Whether market is covered or not
  6. Daily and Seaonal Operating schedule
  7. Accepted Payment Options and Federal Assistance & Nutrition Programs - "WIC", "SFMNP", "EBT":

  8. WIC Vouchers WIC or "Women, Infants, and Children Program" is a Federal assistance program for postpartum, breastfeeding, or low-income women or infants and children found to be at risk for nutritional deficiency. Your Washington WIC agency may provide nutrition education, health care referrals, or supplemental food vouchers good at your local Flea or Farmers Market via your state's WIC Farmers Market Nutrition Program.

SNAP / Food Stamps Benefits

Washington Farmers Market & Flea Market List

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: Yes

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: Yes

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: Yes

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: No EBT: Yes

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: Yes

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: Yes

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: Yes

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: Yes

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: Yes

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: Yes

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: Yes

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: Yes

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: Yes

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: Yes

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Farmers Market
Covered: No
WIC: Yes SFMNP: Yes EBT: No

Washington Flea Market
Covered: No
WIC: No SFMNP: No EBT: No


Find It Fast: Search for Information About WA Flea Markets, Farmers Markets, or other Washington Information

For Your Shopping Pleasure at Washington Farmers Markets Consider the Following Shopping Carts, Reusable Tote Bags, and Convertible Hand Trucks

Below are just a few of my suggestions of higher quality products that will make your farmers market shopping a lot easier. You can scroll the below carousel using the two arrows underneath the images and hover your cursor over each image to see more information.

You can always tell who the more savvy Washington Farmers Market shoppers are because they will be the ones wheeling their Flea Market goodies around in the little strollers, shopping baskets, and carts. Please contact me via the link at the bottom of this page if you have a product idea you have found to be a better market shopping carrier or if you have any other frugal shopping tips or tricks.


Please Help This Directory of Farmers Markets in WA Come to "Fruition"

With your help, I intend to grow this into the largest Washington Flea Market and Farmer's Market Directory online.

So, if you please, suggest a Farmers Market listing if there is a local.

. or any other type of Washington public market you would like to see added.

With your help, the fruits of our labor will create win/win situations for a lot of other frugal-minded visitors from Washington who may be searching for cheap and eco-friendly sources of locally-grown fresh produce, organic foods, or other local delicacies and specialties.

I would also love to publish your Flea Market shopping tips or tricks, or any other Frugal Living Tips or Home-made Recipes you might want to share with the world. Or maybe you have a suggestion or Frugal living question for us. If so, we'd love to hear from you. We invite you to ask or tell here on our Contact Page.


Watch the video: Nirvana Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle Lesson (May 2022).