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Baking is more than a job, it’s a new life

Baking is more than a job, it’s a new life

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February 16, 2014

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Food Tank

There’s some kind of transformation that happens when we learn to bake bread. Bread can effect positive social change.


The Great British Baking Show: Every Burning Question, Answered

The season 10 finale of the beloved baking competition streams on Netflix on Friday.

For 10 seasons now, The Great British Baking Show has captivated audiences across both sides of the pond, with viewers falling in love with its simplistic style and oh-so-sweet creations.

But even the most loyal fans may be left with questions from week to week, and wondering everything from how people get cast on the show to what happens to all those delicious-looking desserts.

Well, never fear! Here are answers to 19 of the show’s biggest mysteries:

1. Why does the show have different names in the U.K. and the U.S.?

American audiences on PBS and Netflix know the show as The Great British Baking Show, but in the U.K., the show airs under its original name, The Great British Bake-Off.

So why the change? It all comes down to copyright. The term �ke Off” is registered to the Pillsbury Company, who since 1949 have held the Pillsbury Bake Off — a contest that searches for the best recipes in the U.S. using its signature flour. Not wanting any confusion among viewers, the company didn’t release the rights, PBS reported, prompting the new title. Ironically, the Pillsbury Bake Off didn’t even begin with that title. It was originally the Grand National Recipe and Baking Contest.

2. Who came up with the idea for the show in the first place?

3. How do you get cast?

It’s not easy. “It is a huge process for us to get to the final 12 contestants,” Beattie admitted to the Radio Times.

More than 16,000 contestants apply via a lengthy application form, the BBC reported, per series producer Sam Beddoes. A researcher sets up a 45-minute phone call with potential hopefuls. From there, 300-400 people make it to the first round of auditions, bringing with them two bakes. A screen test and an interview with a producer comes next. If they get through all of that, casting invites 50-60 people for a second audition — this time in front of the judges — giving them a timed technical challenge and testing to see if they can talk and bake at the same time. An interview with the show psychologist closes things out.

“The baking is 100 percent the most important thing, not personality,” Beddoes said. “You can have brilliant characters, but if they’re going to go out in the first round there’s no point. Part of the charm of Bake Off is that they’re real people from all over the country. It’s such a lovely atmosphere here and we fiercely protect that.”

In the end, a cast of bakers (usually 12) is cast — though Beattie told the Radio Times, “We usually have two standbys, just in case someone pulls out at the last minute or is ill. But only for the first show or two. Then we are up and running.”


The Great British Baking Show: Every Burning Question, Answered

The season 10 finale of the beloved baking competition streams on Netflix on Friday.

For 10 seasons now, The Great British Baking Show has captivated audiences across both sides of the pond, with viewers falling in love with its simplistic style and oh-so-sweet creations.

But even the most loyal fans may be left with questions from week to week, and wondering everything from how people get cast on the show to what happens to all those delicious-looking desserts.

Well, never fear! Here are answers to 19 of the show’s biggest mysteries:

1. Why does the show have different names in the U.K. and the U.S.?

American audiences on PBS and Netflix know the show as The Great British Baking Show, but in the U.K., the show airs under its original name, The Great British Bake-Off.

So why the change? It all comes down to copyright. The term �ke Off” is registered to the Pillsbury Company, who since 1949 have held the Pillsbury Bake Off — a contest that searches for the best recipes in the U.S. using its signature flour. Not wanting any confusion among viewers, the company didn’t release the rights, PBS reported, prompting the new title. Ironically, the Pillsbury Bake Off didn’t even begin with that title. It was originally the Grand National Recipe and Baking Contest.

2. Who came up with the idea for the show in the first place?

3. How do you get cast?

It’s not easy. “It is a huge process for us to get to the final 12 contestants,” Beattie admitted to the Radio Times.

More than 16,000 contestants apply via a lengthy application form, the BBC reported, per series producer Sam Beddoes. A researcher sets up a 45-minute phone call with potential hopefuls. From there, 300-400 people make it to the first round of auditions, bringing with them two bakes. A screen test and an interview with a producer comes next. If they get through all of that, casting invites 50-60 people for a second audition — this time in front of the judges — giving them a timed technical challenge and testing to see if they can talk and bake at the same time. An interview with the show psychologist closes things out.

“The baking is 100 percent the most important thing, not personality,” Beddoes said. “You can have brilliant characters, but if they’re going to go out in the first round there’s no point. Part of the charm of Bake Off is that they’re real people from all over the country. It’s such a lovely atmosphere here and we fiercely protect that.”

In the end, a cast of bakers (usually 12) is cast — though Beattie told the Radio Times, “We usually have two standbys, just in case someone pulls out at the last minute or is ill. But only for the first show or two. Then we are up and running.”


The Great British Baking Show: Every Burning Question, Answered

The season 10 finale of the beloved baking competition streams on Netflix on Friday.

For 10 seasons now, The Great British Baking Show has captivated audiences across both sides of the pond, with viewers falling in love with its simplistic style and oh-so-sweet creations.

But even the most loyal fans may be left with questions from week to week, and wondering everything from how people get cast on the show to what happens to all those delicious-looking desserts.

Well, never fear! Here are answers to 19 of the show’s biggest mysteries:

1. Why does the show have different names in the U.K. and the U.S.?

American audiences on PBS and Netflix know the show as The Great British Baking Show, but in the U.K., the show airs under its original name, The Great British Bake-Off.

So why the change? It all comes down to copyright. The term �ke Off” is registered to the Pillsbury Company, who since 1949 have held the Pillsbury Bake Off — a contest that searches for the best recipes in the U.S. using its signature flour. Not wanting any confusion among viewers, the company didn’t release the rights, PBS reported, prompting the new title. Ironically, the Pillsbury Bake Off didn’t even begin with that title. It was originally the Grand National Recipe and Baking Contest.

2. Who came up with the idea for the show in the first place?

3. How do you get cast?

It’s not easy. “It is a huge process for us to get to the final 12 contestants,” Beattie admitted to the Radio Times.

More than 16,000 contestants apply via a lengthy application form, the BBC reported, per series producer Sam Beddoes. A researcher sets up a 45-minute phone call with potential hopefuls. From there, 300-400 people make it to the first round of auditions, bringing with them two bakes. A screen test and an interview with a producer comes next. If they get through all of that, casting invites 50-60 people for a second audition — this time in front of the judges — giving them a timed technical challenge and testing to see if they can talk and bake at the same time. An interview with the show psychologist closes things out.

“The baking is 100 percent the most important thing, not personality,” Beddoes said. “You can have brilliant characters, but if they’re going to go out in the first round there’s no point. Part of the charm of Bake Off is that they’re real people from all over the country. It’s such a lovely atmosphere here and we fiercely protect that.”

In the end, a cast of bakers (usually 12) is cast — though Beattie told the Radio Times, “We usually have two standbys, just in case someone pulls out at the last minute or is ill. But only for the first show or two. Then we are up and running.”


The Great British Baking Show: Every Burning Question, Answered

The season 10 finale of the beloved baking competition streams on Netflix on Friday.

For 10 seasons now, The Great British Baking Show has captivated audiences across both sides of the pond, with viewers falling in love with its simplistic style and oh-so-sweet creations.

But even the most loyal fans may be left with questions from week to week, and wondering everything from how people get cast on the show to what happens to all those delicious-looking desserts.

Well, never fear! Here are answers to 19 of the show’s biggest mysteries:

1. Why does the show have different names in the U.K. and the U.S.?

American audiences on PBS and Netflix know the show as The Great British Baking Show, but in the U.K., the show airs under its original name, The Great British Bake-Off.

So why the change? It all comes down to copyright. The term �ke Off” is registered to the Pillsbury Company, who since 1949 have held the Pillsbury Bake Off — a contest that searches for the best recipes in the U.S. using its signature flour. Not wanting any confusion among viewers, the company didn’t release the rights, PBS reported, prompting the new title. Ironically, the Pillsbury Bake Off didn’t even begin with that title. It was originally the Grand National Recipe and Baking Contest.

2. Who came up with the idea for the show in the first place?

3. How do you get cast?

It’s not easy. “It is a huge process for us to get to the final 12 contestants,” Beattie admitted to the Radio Times.

More than 16,000 contestants apply via a lengthy application form, the BBC reported, per series producer Sam Beddoes. A researcher sets up a 45-minute phone call with potential hopefuls. From there, 300-400 people make it to the first round of auditions, bringing with them two bakes. A screen test and an interview with a producer comes next. If they get through all of that, casting invites 50-60 people for a second audition — this time in front of the judges — giving them a timed technical challenge and testing to see if they can talk and bake at the same time. An interview with the show psychologist closes things out.

“The baking is 100 percent the most important thing, not personality,” Beddoes said. “You can have brilliant characters, but if they’re going to go out in the first round there’s no point. Part of the charm of Bake Off is that they’re real people from all over the country. It’s such a lovely atmosphere here and we fiercely protect that.”

In the end, a cast of bakers (usually 12) is cast — though Beattie told the Radio Times, “We usually have two standbys, just in case someone pulls out at the last minute or is ill. But only for the first show or two. Then we are up and running.”


The Great British Baking Show: Every Burning Question, Answered

The season 10 finale of the beloved baking competition streams on Netflix on Friday.

For 10 seasons now, The Great British Baking Show has captivated audiences across both sides of the pond, with viewers falling in love with its simplistic style and oh-so-sweet creations.

But even the most loyal fans may be left with questions from week to week, and wondering everything from how people get cast on the show to what happens to all those delicious-looking desserts.

Well, never fear! Here are answers to 19 of the show’s biggest mysteries:

1. Why does the show have different names in the U.K. and the U.S.?

American audiences on PBS and Netflix know the show as The Great British Baking Show, but in the U.K., the show airs under its original name, The Great British Bake-Off.

So why the change? It all comes down to copyright. The term �ke Off” is registered to the Pillsbury Company, who since 1949 have held the Pillsbury Bake Off — a contest that searches for the best recipes in the U.S. using its signature flour. Not wanting any confusion among viewers, the company didn’t release the rights, PBS reported, prompting the new title. Ironically, the Pillsbury Bake Off didn’t even begin with that title. It was originally the Grand National Recipe and Baking Contest.

2. Who came up with the idea for the show in the first place?

3. How do you get cast?

It’s not easy. “It is a huge process for us to get to the final 12 contestants,” Beattie admitted to the Radio Times.

More than 16,000 contestants apply via a lengthy application form, the BBC reported, per series producer Sam Beddoes. A researcher sets up a 45-minute phone call with potential hopefuls. From there, 300-400 people make it to the first round of auditions, bringing with them two bakes. A screen test and an interview with a producer comes next. If they get through all of that, casting invites 50-60 people for a second audition — this time in front of the judges — giving them a timed technical challenge and testing to see if they can talk and bake at the same time. An interview with the show psychologist closes things out.

“The baking is 100 percent the most important thing, not personality,” Beddoes said. “You can have brilliant characters, but if they’re going to go out in the first round there’s no point. Part of the charm of Bake Off is that they’re real people from all over the country. It’s such a lovely atmosphere here and we fiercely protect that.”

In the end, a cast of bakers (usually 12) is cast — though Beattie told the Radio Times, “We usually have two standbys, just in case someone pulls out at the last minute or is ill. But only for the first show or two. Then we are up and running.”


The Great British Baking Show: Every Burning Question, Answered

The season 10 finale of the beloved baking competition streams on Netflix on Friday.

For 10 seasons now, The Great British Baking Show has captivated audiences across both sides of the pond, with viewers falling in love with its simplistic style and oh-so-sweet creations.

But even the most loyal fans may be left with questions from week to week, and wondering everything from how people get cast on the show to what happens to all those delicious-looking desserts.

Well, never fear! Here are answers to 19 of the show’s biggest mysteries:

1. Why does the show have different names in the U.K. and the U.S.?

American audiences on PBS and Netflix know the show as The Great British Baking Show, but in the U.K., the show airs under its original name, The Great British Bake-Off.

So why the change? It all comes down to copyright. The term �ke Off” is registered to the Pillsbury Company, who since 1949 have held the Pillsbury Bake Off — a contest that searches for the best recipes in the U.S. using its signature flour. Not wanting any confusion among viewers, the company didn’t release the rights, PBS reported, prompting the new title. Ironically, the Pillsbury Bake Off didn’t even begin with that title. It was originally the Grand National Recipe and Baking Contest.

2. Who came up with the idea for the show in the first place?

3. How do you get cast?

It’s not easy. “It is a huge process for us to get to the final 12 contestants,” Beattie admitted to the Radio Times.

More than 16,000 contestants apply via a lengthy application form, the BBC reported, per series producer Sam Beddoes. A researcher sets up a 45-minute phone call with potential hopefuls. From there, 300-400 people make it to the first round of auditions, bringing with them two bakes. A screen test and an interview with a producer comes next. If they get through all of that, casting invites 50-60 people for a second audition — this time in front of the judges — giving them a timed technical challenge and testing to see if they can talk and bake at the same time. An interview with the show psychologist closes things out.

“The baking is 100 percent the most important thing, not personality,” Beddoes said. “You can have brilliant characters, but if they’re going to go out in the first round there’s no point. Part of the charm of Bake Off is that they’re real people from all over the country. It’s such a lovely atmosphere here and we fiercely protect that.”

In the end, a cast of bakers (usually 12) is cast — though Beattie told the Radio Times, “We usually have two standbys, just in case someone pulls out at the last minute or is ill. But only for the first show or two. Then we are up and running.”


The Great British Baking Show: Every Burning Question, Answered

The season 10 finale of the beloved baking competition streams on Netflix on Friday.

For 10 seasons now, The Great British Baking Show has captivated audiences across both sides of the pond, with viewers falling in love with its simplistic style and oh-so-sweet creations.

But even the most loyal fans may be left with questions from week to week, and wondering everything from how people get cast on the show to what happens to all those delicious-looking desserts.

Well, never fear! Here are answers to 19 of the show’s biggest mysteries:

1. Why does the show have different names in the U.K. and the U.S.?

American audiences on PBS and Netflix know the show as The Great British Baking Show, but in the U.K., the show airs under its original name, The Great British Bake-Off.

So why the change? It all comes down to copyright. The term �ke Off” is registered to the Pillsbury Company, who since 1949 have held the Pillsbury Bake Off — a contest that searches for the best recipes in the U.S. using its signature flour. Not wanting any confusion among viewers, the company didn’t release the rights, PBS reported, prompting the new title. Ironically, the Pillsbury Bake Off didn’t even begin with that title. It was originally the Grand National Recipe and Baking Contest.

2. Who came up with the idea for the show in the first place?

3. How do you get cast?

It’s not easy. “It is a huge process for us to get to the final 12 contestants,” Beattie admitted to the Radio Times.

More than 16,000 contestants apply via a lengthy application form, the BBC reported, per series producer Sam Beddoes. A researcher sets up a 45-minute phone call with potential hopefuls. From there, 300-400 people make it to the first round of auditions, bringing with them two bakes. A screen test and an interview with a producer comes next. If they get through all of that, casting invites 50-60 people for a second audition — this time in front of the judges — giving them a timed technical challenge and testing to see if they can talk and bake at the same time. An interview with the show psychologist closes things out.

“The baking is 100 percent the most important thing, not personality,” Beddoes said. “You can have brilliant characters, but if they’re going to go out in the first round there’s no point. Part of the charm of Bake Off is that they’re real people from all over the country. It’s such a lovely atmosphere here and we fiercely protect that.”

In the end, a cast of bakers (usually 12) is cast — though Beattie told the Radio Times, “We usually have two standbys, just in case someone pulls out at the last minute or is ill. But only for the first show or two. Then we are up and running.”


The Great British Baking Show: Every Burning Question, Answered

The season 10 finale of the beloved baking competition streams on Netflix on Friday.

For 10 seasons now, The Great British Baking Show has captivated audiences across both sides of the pond, with viewers falling in love with its simplistic style and oh-so-sweet creations.

But even the most loyal fans may be left with questions from week to week, and wondering everything from how people get cast on the show to what happens to all those delicious-looking desserts.

Well, never fear! Here are answers to 19 of the show’s biggest mysteries:

1. Why does the show have different names in the U.K. and the U.S.?

American audiences on PBS and Netflix know the show as The Great British Baking Show, but in the U.K., the show airs under its original name, The Great British Bake-Off.

So why the change? It all comes down to copyright. The term �ke Off” is registered to the Pillsbury Company, who since 1949 have held the Pillsbury Bake Off — a contest that searches for the best recipes in the U.S. using its signature flour. Not wanting any confusion among viewers, the company didn’t release the rights, PBS reported, prompting the new title. Ironically, the Pillsbury Bake Off didn’t even begin with that title. It was originally the Grand National Recipe and Baking Contest.

2. Who came up with the idea for the show in the first place?

3. How do you get cast?

It’s not easy. “It is a huge process for us to get to the final 12 contestants,” Beattie admitted to the Radio Times.

More than 16,000 contestants apply via a lengthy application form, the BBC reported, per series producer Sam Beddoes. A researcher sets up a 45-minute phone call with potential hopefuls. From there, 300-400 people make it to the first round of auditions, bringing with them two bakes. A screen test and an interview with a producer comes next. If they get through all of that, casting invites 50-60 people for a second audition — this time in front of the judges — giving them a timed technical challenge and testing to see if they can talk and bake at the same time. An interview with the show psychologist closes things out.

“The baking is 100 percent the most important thing, not personality,” Beddoes said. “You can have brilliant characters, but if they’re going to go out in the first round there’s no point. Part of the charm of Bake Off is that they’re real people from all over the country. It’s such a lovely atmosphere here and we fiercely protect that.”

In the end, a cast of bakers (usually 12) is cast — though Beattie told the Radio Times, “We usually have two standbys, just in case someone pulls out at the last minute or is ill. But only for the first show or two. Then we are up and running.”


The Great British Baking Show: Every Burning Question, Answered

The season 10 finale of the beloved baking competition streams on Netflix on Friday.

For 10 seasons now, The Great British Baking Show has captivated audiences across both sides of the pond, with viewers falling in love with its simplistic style and oh-so-sweet creations.

But even the most loyal fans may be left with questions from week to week, and wondering everything from how people get cast on the show to what happens to all those delicious-looking desserts.

Well, never fear! Here are answers to 19 of the show’s biggest mysteries:

1. Why does the show have different names in the U.K. and the U.S.?

American audiences on PBS and Netflix know the show as The Great British Baking Show, but in the U.K., the show airs under its original name, The Great British Bake-Off.

So why the change? It all comes down to copyright. The term �ke Off” is registered to the Pillsbury Company, who since 1949 have held the Pillsbury Bake Off — a contest that searches for the best recipes in the U.S. using its signature flour. Not wanting any confusion among viewers, the company didn’t release the rights, PBS reported, prompting the new title. Ironically, the Pillsbury Bake Off didn’t even begin with that title. It was originally the Grand National Recipe and Baking Contest.

2. Who came up with the idea for the show in the first place?

3. How do you get cast?

It’s not easy. “It is a huge process for us to get to the final 12 contestants,” Beattie admitted to the Radio Times.

More than 16,000 contestants apply via a lengthy application form, the BBC reported, per series producer Sam Beddoes. A researcher sets up a 45-minute phone call with potential hopefuls. From there, 300-400 people make it to the first round of auditions, bringing with them two bakes. A screen test and an interview with a producer comes next. If they get through all of that, casting invites 50-60 people for a second audition — this time in front of the judges — giving them a timed technical challenge and testing to see if they can talk and bake at the same time. An interview with the show psychologist closes things out.

“The baking is 100 percent the most important thing, not personality,” Beddoes said. “You can have brilliant characters, but if they’re going to go out in the first round there’s no point. Part of the charm of Bake Off is that they’re real people from all over the country. It’s such a lovely atmosphere here and we fiercely protect that.”

In the end, a cast of bakers (usually 12) is cast — though Beattie told the Radio Times, “We usually have two standbys, just in case someone pulls out at the last minute or is ill. But only for the first show or two. Then we are up and running.”


The Great British Baking Show: Every Burning Question, Answered

The season 10 finale of the beloved baking competition streams on Netflix on Friday.

For 10 seasons now, The Great British Baking Show has captivated audiences across both sides of the pond, with viewers falling in love with its simplistic style and oh-so-sweet creations.

But even the most loyal fans may be left with questions from week to week, and wondering everything from how people get cast on the show to what happens to all those delicious-looking desserts.

Well, never fear! Here are answers to 19 of the show’s biggest mysteries:

1. Why does the show have different names in the U.K. and the U.S.?

American audiences on PBS and Netflix know the show as The Great British Baking Show, but in the U.K., the show airs under its original name, The Great British Bake-Off.

So why the change? It all comes down to copyright. The term �ke Off” is registered to the Pillsbury Company, who since 1949 have held the Pillsbury Bake Off — a contest that searches for the best recipes in the U.S. using its signature flour. Not wanting any confusion among viewers, the company didn’t release the rights, PBS reported, prompting the new title. Ironically, the Pillsbury Bake Off didn’t even begin with that title. It was originally the Grand National Recipe and Baking Contest.

2. Who came up with the idea for the show in the first place?

3. How do you get cast?

It’s not easy. “It is a huge process for us to get to the final 12 contestants,” Beattie admitted to the Radio Times.

More than 16,000 contestants apply via a lengthy application form, the BBC reported, per series producer Sam Beddoes. A researcher sets up a 45-minute phone call with potential hopefuls. From there, 300-400 people make it to the first round of auditions, bringing with them two bakes. A screen test and an interview with a producer comes next. If they get through all of that, casting invites 50-60 people for a second audition — this time in front of the judges — giving them a timed technical challenge and testing to see if they can talk and bake at the same time. An interview with the show psychologist closes things out.

“The baking is 100 percent the most important thing, not personality,” Beddoes said. “You can have brilliant characters, but if they’re going to go out in the first round there’s no point. Part of the charm of Bake Off is that they’re real people from all over the country. It’s such a lovely atmosphere here and we fiercely protect that.”

In the end, a cast of bakers (usually 12) is cast — though Beattie told the Radio Times, “We usually have two standbys, just in case someone pulls out at the last minute or is ill. But only for the first show or two. Then we are up and running.”