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Artificially Intelligent Robotic Bartender Fit For Don Draper

Artificially Intelligent Robotic Bartender Fit For Don Draper


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Did you know there is a Kickstarter for an artificially intelligent robotic bartender named Monsieur? Before you begin envisioning Johnny Five at a bar, taking orders and mixing drinks with the flourish only he can achieve, Monsieur is more of a smart box than it is a fully functioning robot. That said, the invention is pretty cool and would be a fantastic addition to any party. Apparently the gadget will make the perfect drink at the perfect time, tailoring the mix to meet different needs (even non-alcoholic ones). You use the touchscreen to explore the cocktail list and choose how strong you want your drink, from normal to "boss." Over time, the machine will learn what you like and prepare your drinks accordingly. It will also suggest different drinks to you, based off of your taste profile. If you're having a party, Monsieur has 12 built-in themes, like Girl's Night Out and Mardi Gras, with around 25 different drinks in each. With the accompanying app, you will get alerts when the ingredients are running low and can monitor your blood alcohol level. For all you Don Drapers out there, you can even use Monsieur as a person butler, so when you come home from a long day at the office, a drink will be waiting.


Drink-Based Characterization

In certain moments, attention is drawn to what a character is drinking because it emphasizes their personality in some way. "Harder/grittier" drinks, such as black coffee or strong alcohol, contrast against "softer/weaker" drinks, such as mocha cappuccino latte or milk. Sometimes these characterizations are temporary, such as when a teetotaler decides I Need a Freaking Drink. Other cases may be examples of Trademark Favourite Food, where it implies an urge of consistency in their personality, but rarely anything else. The examples below should indicate both a drink and a trait.

Sometimes characters order "against type", subverting audience expectations (although this is still playing the trope straight), such as a hardboiled character ordering milk or something sweet and girly.

Some common personality shorthands are as follows:

  • Bubbly and upbeat feminine/effeminate personalities are often indicated by especially sweet/fruity cocktails or wines. If they order tea or coffee, this would be indicated by having some milk and lots of syrup/honey/sugar (or sugar substitute).
  • Tough/dangerous is indicated by drinking something with a very strong and usually bitter taste. Real Men Take It Black is a Sub-Trope in this category and is specific for coffee. The Gargle Blaster is usually a "hard" liquor that shows how high a character's pain tolerance is.
  • British culture/affectations can be indicated by characters having a Spot of Tea in unusual situations.
  • Snobbery or pretentiousness can be indicated by characters creating an Overcomplicated Menu Order.
  • Wine Is Classy is a Sub-Trope indicating the drinker is a sophisticated intellectual. Does not apply for cheap wines (especially boxed wine), which instead indicates low economic class/upbringing. A further Sub-Trope is A Glass of Chianti, where drinking red wine is used to indicate a villainous personality that is rich/well-bred. Either version may appear as an Invoked Trope where the character is attempting to appear high-class but doesn't actually know how to "properly" enjoy the wine.

The drink order can be code for nationality and social class. See National Drinks for more details.

Has some overlap with Age-Stereotypical Food. See also Luxurious Liquor, when what is communicated by a character's choice of drink (one rarely ordered but always found on hand) is their liquid assets. Also goes well with Must Have Caffeine.

Contrast Your Favorite and Trademark Favorite Drink, where the drink doesn't represent anything about the character's personality, it's just a character is expressing a fondness. These tropes can overlap, and drink orders themselves are likely to be delivered in the form of The Triple.


Drink-Based Characterization

In certain moments, attention is drawn to what a character is drinking because it emphasizes their personality in some way. "Harder/grittier" drinks, such as black coffee or strong alcohol, contrast against "softer/weaker" drinks, such as mocha cappuccino latte or milk. Sometimes these characterizations are temporary, such as when a teetotaler decides I Need a Freaking Drink. Other cases may be examples of Trademark Favourite Food, where it implies an urge of consistency in their personality, but rarely anything else. The examples below should indicate both a drink and a trait.

Sometimes characters order "against type", subverting audience expectations (although this is still playing the trope straight), such as a hardboiled character ordering milk or something sweet and girly.

Some common personality shorthands are as follows:

  • Bubbly and upbeat feminine/effeminate personalities are often indicated by especially sweet/fruity cocktails or wines. If they order tea or coffee, this would be indicated by having some milk and lots of syrup/honey/sugar (or sugar substitute).
  • Tough/dangerous is indicated by drinking something with a very strong and usually bitter taste. Real Men Take It Black is a Sub-Trope in this category and is specific for coffee. The Gargle Blaster is usually a "hard" liquor that shows how high a character's pain tolerance is.
  • British culture/affectations can be indicated by characters having a Spot of Tea in unusual situations.
  • Snobbery or pretentiousness can be indicated by characters creating an Overcomplicated Menu Order.
  • Wine Is Classy is a Sub-Trope indicating the drinker is a sophisticated intellectual. Does not apply for cheap wines (especially boxed wine), which instead indicates low economic class/upbringing. A further Sub-Trope is A Glass of Chianti, where drinking red wine is used to indicate a villainous personality that is rich/well-bred. Either version may appear as an Invoked Trope where the character is attempting to appear high-class but doesn't actually know how to "properly" enjoy the wine.

The drink order can be code for nationality and social class. See National Drinks for more details.

Has some overlap with Age-Stereotypical Food. See also Luxurious Liquor, when what is communicated by a character's choice of drink (one rarely ordered but always found on hand) is their liquid assets. Also goes well with Must Have Caffeine.

Contrast Your Favorite and Trademark Favorite Drink, where the drink doesn't represent anything about the character's personality, it's just a character is expressing a fondness. These tropes can overlap, and drink orders themselves are likely to be delivered in the form of The Triple.


Drink-Based Characterization

In certain moments, attention is drawn to what a character is drinking because it emphasizes their personality in some way. "Harder/grittier" drinks, such as black coffee or strong alcohol, contrast against "softer/weaker" drinks, such as mocha cappuccino latte or milk. Sometimes these characterizations are temporary, such as when a teetotaler decides I Need a Freaking Drink. Other cases may be examples of Trademark Favourite Food, where it implies an urge of consistency in their personality, but rarely anything else. The examples below should indicate both a drink and a trait.

Sometimes characters order "against type", subverting audience expectations (although this is still playing the trope straight), such as a hardboiled character ordering milk or something sweet and girly.

Some common personality shorthands are as follows:

  • Bubbly and upbeat feminine/effeminate personalities are often indicated by especially sweet/fruity cocktails or wines. If they order tea or coffee, this would be indicated by having some milk and lots of syrup/honey/sugar (or sugar substitute).
  • Tough/dangerous is indicated by drinking something with a very strong and usually bitter taste. Real Men Take It Black is a Sub-Trope in this category and is specific for coffee. The Gargle Blaster is usually a "hard" liquor that shows how high a character's pain tolerance is.
  • British culture/affectations can be indicated by characters having a Spot of Tea in unusual situations.
  • Snobbery or pretentiousness can be indicated by characters creating an Overcomplicated Menu Order.
  • Wine Is Classy is a Sub-Trope indicating the drinker is a sophisticated intellectual. Does not apply for cheap wines (especially boxed wine), which instead indicates low economic class/upbringing. A further Sub-Trope is A Glass of Chianti, where drinking red wine is used to indicate a villainous personality that is rich/well-bred. Either version may appear as an Invoked Trope where the character is attempting to appear high-class but doesn't actually know how to "properly" enjoy the wine.

The drink order can be code for nationality and social class. See National Drinks for more details.

Has some overlap with Age-Stereotypical Food. See also Luxurious Liquor, when what is communicated by a character's choice of drink (one rarely ordered but always found on hand) is their liquid assets. Also goes well with Must Have Caffeine.

Contrast Your Favorite and Trademark Favorite Drink, where the drink doesn't represent anything about the character's personality, it's just a character is expressing a fondness. These tropes can overlap, and drink orders themselves are likely to be delivered in the form of The Triple.


Drink-Based Characterization

In certain moments, attention is drawn to what a character is drinking because it emphasizes their personality in some way. "Harder/grittier" drinks, such as black coffee or strong alcohol, contrast against "softer/weaker" drinks, such as mocha cappuccino latte or milk. Sometimes these characterizations are temporary, such as when a teetotaler decides I Need a Freaking Drink. Other cases may be examples of Trademark Favourite Food, where it implies an urge of consistency in their personality, but rarely anything else. The examples below should indicate both a drink and a trait.

Sometimes characters order "against type", subverting audience expectations (although this is still playing the trope straight), such as a hardboiled character ordering milk or something sweet and girly.

Some common personality shorthands are as follows:

  • Bubbly and upbeat feminine/effeminate personalities are often indicated by especially sweet/fruity cocktails or wines. If they order tea or coffee, this would be indicated by having some milk and lots of syrup/honey/sugar (or sugar substitute).
  • Tough/dangerous is indicated by drinking something with a very strong and usually bitter taste. Real Men Take It Black is a Sub-Trope in this category and is specific for coffee. The Gargle Blaster is usually a "hard" liquor that shows how high a character's pain tolerance is.
  • British culture/affectations can be indicated by characters having a Spot of Tea in unusual situations.
  • Snobbery or pretentiousness can be indicated by characters creating an Overcomplicated Menu Order.
  • Wine Is Classy is a Sub-Trope indicating the drinker is a sophisticated intellectual. Does not apply for cheap wines (especially boxed wine), which instead indicates low economic class/upbringing. A further Sub-Trope is A Glass of Chianti, where drinking red wine is used to indicate a villainous personality that is rich/well-bred. Either version may appear as an Invoked Trope where the character is attempting to appear high-class but doesn't actually know how to "properly" enjoy the wine.

The drink order can be code for nationality and social class. See National Drinks for more details.

Has some overlap with Age-Stereotypical Food. See also Luxurious Liquor, when what is communicated by a character's choice of drink (one rarely ordered but always found on hand) is their liquid assets. Also goes well with Must Have Caffeine.

Contrast Your Favorite and Trademark Favorite Drink, where the drink doesn't represent anything about the character's personality, it's just a character is expressing a fondness. These tropes can overlap, and drink orders themselves are likely to be delivered in the form of The Triple.


Drink-Based Characterization

In certain moments, attention is drawn to what a character is drinking because it emphasizes their personality in some way. "Harder/grittier" drinks, such as black coffee or strong alcohol, contrast against "softer/weaker" drinks, such as mocha cappuccino latte or milk. Sometimes these characterizations are temporary, such as when a teetotaler decides I Need a Freaking Drink. Other cases may be examples of Trademark Favourite Food, where it implies an urge of consistency in their personality, but rarely anything else. The examples below should indicate both a drink and a trait.

Sometimes characters order "against type", subverting audience expectations (although this is still playing the trope straight), such as a hardboiled character ordering milk or something sweet and girly.

Some common personality shorthands are as follows:

  • Bubbly and upbeat feminine/effeminate personalities are often indicated by especially sweet/fruity cocktails or wines. If they order tea or coffee, this would be indicated by having some milk and lots of syrup/honey/sugar (or sugar substitute).
  • Tough/dangerous is indicated by drinking something with a very strong and usually bitter taste. Real Men Take It Black is a Sub-Trope in this category and is specific for coffee. The Gargle Blaster is usually a "hard" liquor that shows how high a character's pain tolerance is.
  • British culture/affectations can be indicated by characters having a Spot of Tea in unusual situations.
  • Snobbery or pretentiousness can be indicated by characters creating an Overcomplicated Menu Order.
  • Wine Is Classy is a Sub-Trope indicating the drinker is a sophisticated intellectual. Does not apply for cheap wines (especially boxed wine), which instead indicates low economic class/upbringing. A further Sub-Trope is A Glass of Chianti, where drinking red wine is used to indicate a villainous personality that is rich/well-bred. Either version may appear as an Invoked Trope where the character is attempting to appear high-class but doesn't actually know how to "properly" enjoy the wine.

The drink order can be code for nationality and social class. See National Drinks for more details.

Has some overlap with Age-Stereotypical Food. See also Luxurious Liquor, when what is communicated by a character's choice of drink (one rarely ordered but always found on hand) is their liquid assets. Also goes well with Must Have Caffeine.

Contrast Your Favorite and Trademark Favorite Drink, where the drink doesn't represent anything about the character's personality, it's just a character is expressing a fondness. These tropes can overlap, and drink orders themselves are likely to be delivered in the form of The Triple.


Drink-Based Characterization

In certain moments, attention is drawn to what a character is drinking because it emphasizes their personality in some way. "Harder/grittier" drinks, such as black coffee or strong alcohol, contrast against "softer/weaker" drinks, such as mocha cappuccino latte or milk. Sometimes these characterizations are temporary, such as when a teetotaler decides I Need a Freaking Drink. Other cases may be examples of Trademark Favourite Food, where it implies an urge of consistency in their personality, but rarely anything else. The examples below should indicate both a drink and a trait.

Sometimes characters order "against type", subverting audience expectations (although this is still playing the trope straight), such as a hardboiled character ordering milk or something sweet and girly.

Some common personality shorthands are as follows:

  • Bubbly and upbeat feminine/effeminate personalities are often indicated by especially sweet/fruity cocktails or wines. If they order tea or coffee, this would be indicated by having some milk and lots of syrup/honey/sugar (or sugar substitute).
  • Tough/dangerous is indicated by drinking something with a very strong and usually bitter taste. Real Men Take It Black is a Sub-Trope in this category and is specific for coffee. The Gargle Blaster is usually a "hard" liquor that shows how high a character's pain tolerance is.
  • British culture/affectations can be indicated by characters having a Spot of Tea in unusual situations.
  • Snobbery or pretentiousness can be indicated by characters creating an Overcomplicated Menu Order.
  • Wine Is Classy is a Sub-Trope indicating the drinker is a sophisticated intellectual. Does not apply for cheap wines (especially boxed wine), which instead indicates low economic class/upbringing. A further Sub-Trope is A Glass of Chianti, where drinking red wine is used to indicate a villainous personality that is rich/well-bred. Either version may appear as an Invoked Trope where the character is attempting to appear high-class but doesn't actually know how to "properly" enjoy the wine.

The drink order can be code for nationality and social class. See National Drinks for more details.

Has some overlap with Age-Stereotypical Food. See also Luxurious Liquor, when what is communicated by a character's choice of drink (one rarely ordered but always found on hand) is their liquid assets. Also goes well with Must Have Caffeine.

Contrast Your Favorite and Trademark Favorite Drink, where the drink doesn't represent anything about the character's personality, it's just a character is expressing a fondness. These tropes can overlap, and drink orders themselves are likely to be delivered in the form of The Triple.


Drink-Based Characterization

In certain moments, attention is drawn to what a character is drinking because it emphasizes their personality in some way. "Harder/grittier" drinks, such as black coffee or strong alcohol, contrast against "softer/weaker" drinks, such as mocha cappuccino latte or milk. Sometimes these characterizations are temporary, such as when a teetotaler decides I Need a Freaking Drink. Other cases may be examples of Trademark Favourite Food, where it implies an urge of consistency in their personality, but rarely anything else. The examples below should indicate both a drink and a trait.

Sometimes characters order "against type", subverting audience expectations (although this is still playing the trope straight), such as a hardboiled character ordering milk or something sweet and girly.

Some common personality shorthands are as follows:

  • Bubbly and upbeat feminine/effeminate personalities are often indicated by especially sweet/fruity cocktails or wines. If they order tea or coffee, this would be indicated by having some milk and lots of syrup/honey/sugar (or sugar substitute).
  • Tough/dangerous is indicated by drinking something with a very strong and usually bitter taste. Real Men Take It Black is a Sub-Trope in this category and is specific for coffee. The Gargle Blaster is usually a "hard" liquor that shows how high a character's pain tolerance is.
  • British culture/affectations can be indicated by characters having a Spot of Tea in unusual situations.
  • Snobbery or pretentiousness can be indicated by characters creating an Overcomplicated Menu Order.
  • Wine Is Classy is a Sub-Trope indicating the drinker is a sophisticated intellectual. Does not apply for cheap wines (especially boxed wine), which instead indicates low economic class/upbringing. A further Sub-Trope is A Glass of Chianti, where drinking red wine is used to indicate a villainous personality that is rich/well-bred. Either version may appear as an Invoked Trope where the character is attempting to appear high-class but doesn't actually know how to "properly" enjoy the wine.

The drink order can be code for nationality and social class. See National Drinks for more details.

Has some overlap with Age-Stereotypical Food. See also Luxurious Liquor, when what is communicated by a character's choice of drink (one rarely ordered but always found on hand) is their liquid assets. Also goes well with Must Have Caffeine.

Contrast Your Favorite and Trademark Favorite Drink, where the drink doesn't represent anything about the character's personality, it's just a character is expressing a fondness. These tropes can overlap, and drink orders themselves are likely to be delivered in the form of The Triple.


Drink-Based Characterization

In certain moments, attention is drawn to what a character is drinking because it emphasizes their personality in some way. "Harder/grittier" drinks, such as black coffee or strong alcohol, contrast against "softer/weaker" drinks, such as mocha cappuccino latte or milk. Sometimes these characterizations are temporary, such as when a teetotaler decides I Need a Freaking Drink. Other cases may be examples of Trademark Favourite Food, where it implies an urge of consistency in their personality, but rarely anything else. The examples below should indicate both a drink and a trait.

Sometimes characters order "against type", subverting audience expectations (although this is still playing the trope straight), such as a hardboiled character ordering milk or something sweet and girly.

Some common personality shorthands are as follows:

  • Bubbly and upbeat feminine/effeminate personalities are often indicated by especially sweet/fruity cocktails or wines. If they order tea or coffee, this would be indicated by having some milk and lots of syrup/honey/sugar (or sugar substitute).
  • Tough/dangerous is indicated by drinking something with a very strong and usually bitter taste. Real Men Take It Black is a Sub-Trope in this category and is specific for coffee. The Gargle Blaster is usually a "hard" liquor that shows how high a character's pain tolerance is.
  • British culture/affectations can be indicated by characters having a Spot of Tea in unusual situations.
  • Snobbery or pretentiousness can be indicated by characters creating an Overcomplicated Menu Order.
  • Wine Is Classy is a Sub-Trope indicating the drinker is a sophisticated intellectual. Does not apply for cheap wines (especially boxed wine), which instead indicates low economic class/upbringing. A further Sub-Trope is A Glass of Chianti, where drinking red wine is used to indicate a villainous personality that is rich/well-bred. Either version may appear as an Invoked Trope where the character is attempting to appear high-class but doesn't actually know how to "properly" enjoy the wine.

The drink order can be code for nationality and social class. See National Drinks for more details.

Has some overlap with Age-Stereotypical Food. See also Luxurious Liquor, when what is communicated by a character's choice of drink (one rarely ordered but always found on hand) is their liquid assets. Also goes well with Must Have Caffeine.

Contrast Your Favorite and Trademark Favorite Drink, where the drink doesn't represent anything about the character's personality, it's just a character is expressing a fondness. These tropes can overlap, and drink orders themselves are likely to be delivered in the form of The Triple.


Drink-Based Characterization

In certain moments, attention is drawn to what a character is drinking because it emphasizes their personality in some way. "Harder/grittier" drinks, such as black coffee or strong alcohol, contrast against "softer/weaker" drinks, such as mocha cappuccino latte or milk. Sometimes these characterizations are temporary, such as when a teetotaler decides I Need a Freaking Drink. Other cases may be examples of Trademark Favourite Food, where it implies an urge of consistency in their personality, but rarely anything else. The examples below should indicate both a drink and a trait.

Sometimes characters order "against type", subverting audience expectations (although this is still playing the trope straight), such as a hardboiled character ordering milk or something sweet and girly.

Some common personality shorthands are as follows:

  • Bubbly and upbeat feminine/effeminate personalities are often indicated by especially sweet/fruity cocktails or wines. If they order tea or coffee, this would be indicated by having some milk and lots of syrup/honey/sugar (or sugar substitute).
  • Tough/dangerous is indicated by drinking something with a very strong and usually bitter taste. Real Men Take It Black is a Sub-Trope in this category and is specific for coffee. The Gargle Blaster is usually a "hard" liquor that shows how high a character's pain tolerance is.
  • British culture/affectations can be indicated by characters having a Spot of Tea in unusual situations.
  • Snobbery or pretentiousness can be indicated by characters creating an Overcomplicated Menu Order.
  • Wine Is Classy is a Sub-Trope indicating the drinker is a sophisticated intellectual. Does not apply for cheap wines (especially boxed wine), which instead indicates low economic class/upbringing. A further Sub-Trope is A Glass of Chianti, where drinking red wine is used to indicate a villainous personality that is rich/well-bred. Either version may appear as an Invoked Trope where the character is attempting to appear high-class but doesn't actually know how to "properly" enjoy the wine.

The drink order can be code for nationality and social class. See National Drinks for more details.

Has some overlap with Age-Stereotypical Food. See also Luxurious Liquor, when what is communicated by a character's choice of drink (one rarely ordered but always found on hand) is their liquid assets. Also goes well with Must Have Caffeine.

Contrast Your Favorite and Trademark Favorite Drink, where the drink doesn't represent anything about the character's personality, it's just a character is expressing a fondness. These tropes can overlap, and drink orders themselves are likely to be delivered in the form of The Triple.


Drink-Based Characterization

In certain moments, attention is drawn to what a character is drinking because it emphasizes their personality in some way. "Harder/grittier" drinks, such as black coffee or strong alcohol, contrast against "softer/weaker" drinks, such as mocha cappuccino latte or milk. Sometimes these characterizations are temporary, such as when a teetotaler decides I Need a Freaking Drink. Other cases may be examples of Trademark Favourite Food, where it implies an urge of consistency in their personality, but rarely anything else. The examples below should indicate both a drink and a trait.

Sometimes characters order "against type", subverting audience expectations (although this is still playing the trope straight), such as a hardboiled character ordering milk or something sweet and girly.

Some common personality shorthands are as follows:

  • Bubbly and upbeat feminine/effeminate personalities are often indicated by especially sweet/fruity cocktails or wines. If they order tea or coffee, this would be indicated by having some milk and lots of syrup/honey/sugar (or sugar substitute).
  • Tough/dangerous is indicated by drinking something with a very strong and usually bitter taste. Real Men Take It Black is a Sub-Trope in this category and is specific for coffee. The Gargle Blaster is usually a "hard" liquor that shows how high a character's pain tolerance is.
  • British culture/affectations can be indicated by characters having a Spot of Tea in unusual situations.
  • Snobbery or pretentiousness can be indicated by characters creating an Overcomplicated Menu Order.
  • Wine Is Classy is a Sub-Trope indicating the drinker is a sophisticated intellectual. Does not apply for cheap wines (especially boxed wine), which instead indicates low economic class/upbringing. A further Sub-Trope is A Glass of Chianti, where drinking red wine is used to indicate a villainous personality that is rich/well-bred. Either version may appear as an Invoked Trope where the character is attempting to appear high-class but doesn't actually know how to "properly" enjoy the wine.

The drink order can be code for nationality and social class. See National Drinks for more details.

Has some overlap with Age-Stereotypical Food. See also Luxurious Liquor, when what is communicated by a character's choice of drink (one rarely ordered but always found on hand) is their liquid assets. Also goes well with Must Have Caffeine.

Contrast Your Favorite and Trademark Favorite Drink, where the drink doesn't represent anything about the character's personality, it's just a character is expressing a fondness. These tropes can overlap, and drink orders themselves are likely to be delivered in the form of The Triple.


Watch the video: SirMixABot Robotic Bartender: 1000+ Cocktails in 4 Simple Steps (May 2022).