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Eating Meat From China and Mexico Could Result in Positive Test Results for Performance-Enhancing Drugs, NFL Warns Players

Eating Meat From China and Mexico Could Result in Positive Test Results for Performance-Enhancing Drugs, NFL Warns Players

Though the substance is banned in both countries for use in meat-producing animals, it is often used illegally in animal feed

At least one NFL player tested positive for the drug after having spent a week in Mexico and eating local meat.

A new NFL memo is warning its players that meat produced in China and Mexico could potentially contain clenbuterol, a stimulant that is on the league’s list of banned performance-enhancing drugs.

“Consuming large quantities of meat while visiting [China or Mexico] may result in a positive test,” cautioned a notice from the NFL’s independent drug-testing program. “Please take caution if you decide to consume meat, and understand that you do so at your own risk.”

Though the substance is not licensed for use in meat-producing animals in the United States, the European Union, Mexico, and China, clenbuterol has been linked to a number of food poisoning outbreaks around the world, often as a result of the illegal use of the growth-promoting drug in livestock feed.

At least one player, Houston Texans left tackle Duane Brown, previously tested positive for clenbuterol, after having spent a week in Mexico and eating locally produced meat, sources told ESPN. It took months before Brown, who faced a 10-game suspension, was cleared to play.

“Players are responsible for what is in their bodies,” the warning letter said in closing.


[0:00-5:00] JAMES WILKES LIFE

The film starts with some stories about the narrator&rsquos life and brief UFC career a decade ago and a summarized philosophy from from Bruce Lee:

  • Research your own experience
  • Absorb what is useful
  • Reject what is useless
  • Add what is specifically your own

I love Bruce Lee as much as the next gal, but his set of recommendations should not be extended to science and nutrition. I would adjust these recommendations for nutrition to the following:

  • Research quality scientific literature
  • Absorb the full consensus of the literature (do not cherry pick * articles)
  • Reject anecdote as evidence and do not assume correlations mean causation**
  • Adjust choices based on data and trade offs you are willing to make for personal p reference

Cherry Picking Explained


What does it mean to &ldquocherry pick&rdquo articles? This is a term used to describe people taking one or two single studies that support their claim and ignoring a whole other body of research that refutes it. An example would be taking the one pair of blue cherries off of this tree and proclaiming that the tree is a blue cherry tree and only produces blue cherries, when there is actually more evidence that it is a red cherry tree or at least a red and blue cherry tree. (Image used with creative commons license from skepticalscience.com).

**Correlation does not necessarily indicate a causal relationship example

Imagine you did a study of male workers at several different companies and found a positive correlation between good job performance and baldness (bald men tended to perform better at their jobs). What you cannot do here is assume that being bald caused you to perform better. There are alternative possible conclusions and more research would be needed to determine what variable was likely responsible for better performance. One example might be that older men had been working at their jobs longer, had more experience, and therefor performed better and it just so happens that older men are more likely to be bald. Another explanation might be that working long hours results in better performances but also results in high stress, which increases hair loss. There might be more possible explanations (a gene for baldness that co-inherits with a gene for good work ethic and so on). The point here is that seeing the initial correlation (two things that happen to occur at the same time often) does not allow you to conclude what caused what and more research is needed to determine likely relationships.


[0:00-5:00] JAMES WILKES LIFE

The film starts with some stories about the narrator&rsquos life and brief UFC career a decade ago and a summarized philosophy from from Bruce Lee:

  • Research your own experience
  • Absorb what is useful
  • Reject what is useless
  • Add what is specifically your own

I love Bruce Lee as much as the next gal, but his set of recommendations should not be extended to science and nutrition. I would adjust these recommendations for nutrition to the following:

  • Research quality scientific literature
  • Absorb the full consensus of the literature (do not cherry pick * articles)
  • Reject anecdote as evidence and do not assume correlations mean causation**
  • Adjust choices based on data and trade offs you are willing to make for personal p reference

Cherry Picking Explained


What does it mean to &ldquocherry pick&rdquo articles? This is a term used to describe people taking one or two single studies that support their claim and ignoring a whole other body of research that refutes it. An example would be taking the one pair of blue cherries off of this tree and proclaiming that the tree is a blue cherry tree and only produces blue cherries, when there is actually more evidence that it is a red cherry tree or at least a red and blue cherry tree. (Image used with creative commons license from skepticalscience.com).

**Correlation does not necessarily indicate a causal relationship example

Imagine you did a study of male workers at several different companies and found a positive correlation between good job performance and baldness (bald men tended to perform better at their jobs). What you cannot do here is assume that being bald caused you to perform better. There are alternative possible conclusions and more research would be needed to determine what variable was likely responsible for better performance. One example might be that older men had been working at their jobs longer, had more experience, and therefor performed better and it just so happens that older men are more likely to be bald. Another explanation might be that working long hours results in better performances but also results in high stress, which increases hair loss. There might be more possible explanations (a gene for baldness that co-inherits with a gene for good work ethic and so on). The point here is that seeing the initial correlation (two things that happen to occur at the same time often) does not allow you to conclude what caused what and more research is needed to determine likely relationships.


[0:00-5:00] JAMES WILKES LIFE

The film starts with some stories about the narrator&rsquos life and brief UFC career a decade ago and a summarized philosophy from from Bruce Lee:

  • Research your own experience
  • Absorb what is useful
  • Reject what is useless
  • Add what is specifically your own

I love Bruce Lee as much as the next gal, but his set of recommendations should not be extended to science and nutrition. I would adjust these recommendations for nutrition to the following:

  • Research quality scientific literature
  • Absorb the full consensus of the literature (do not cherry pick * articles)
  • Reject anecdote as evidence and do not assume correlations mean causation**
  • Adjust choices based on data and trade offs you are willing to make for personal p reference

Cherry Picking Explained


What does it mean to &ldquocherry pick&rdquo articles? This is a term used to describe people taking one or two single studies that support their claim and ignoring a whole other body of research that refutes it. An example would be taking the one pair of blue cherries off of this tree and proclaiming that the tree is a blue cherry tree and only produces blue cherries, when there is actually more evidence that it is a red cherry tree or at least a red and blue cherry tree. (Image used with creative commons license from skepticalscience.com).

**Correlation does not necessarily indicate a causal relationship example

Imagine you did a study of male workers at several different companies and found a positive correlation between good job performance and baldness (bald men tended to perform better at their jobs). What you cannot do here is assume that being bald caused you to perform better. There are alternative possible conclusions and more research would be needed to determine what variable was likely responsible for better performance. One example might be that older men had been working at their jobs longer, had more experience, and therefor performed better and it just so happens that older men are more likely to be bald. Another explanation might be that working long hours results in better performances but also results in high stress, which increases hair loss. There might be more possible explanations (a gene for baldness that co-inherits with a gene for good work ethic and so on). The point here is that seeing the initial correlation (two things that happen to occur at the same time often) does not allow you to conclude what caused what and more research is needed to determine likely relationships.


[0:00-5:00] JAMES WILKES LIFE

The film starts with some stories about the narrator&rsquos life and brief UFC career a decade ago and a summarized philosophy from from Bruce Lee:

  • Research your own experience
  • Absorb what is useful
  • Reject what is useless
  • Add what is specifically your own

I love Bruce Lee as much as the next gal, but his set of recommendations should not be extended to science and nutrition. I would adjust these recommendations for nutrition to the following:

  • Research quality scientific literature
  • Absorb the full consensus of the literature (do not cherry pick * articles)
  • Reject anecdote as evidence and do not assume correlations mean causation**
  • Adjust choices based on data and trade offs you are willing to make for personal p reference

Cherry Picking Explained


What does it mean to &ldquocherry pick&rdquo articles? This is a term used to describe people taking one or two single studies that support their claim and ignoring a whole other body of research that refutes it. An example would be taking the one pair of blue cherries off of this tree and proclaiming that the tree is a blue cherry tree and only produces blue cherries, when there is actually more evidence that it is a red cherry tree or at least a red and blue cherry tree. (Image used with creative commons license from skepticalscience.com).

**Correlation does not necessarily indicate a causal relationship example

Imagine you did a study of male workers at several different companies and found a positive correlation between good job performance and baldness (bald men tended to perform better at their jobs). What you cannot do here is assume that being bald caused you to perform better. There are alternative possible conclusions and more research would be needed to determine what variable was likely responsible for better performance. One example might be that older men had been working at their jobs longer, had more experience, and therefor performed better and it just so happens that older men are more likely to be bald. Another explanation might be that working long hours results in better performances but also results in high stress, which increases hair loss. There might be more possible explanations (a gene for baldness that co-inherits with a gene for good work ethic and so on). The point here is that seeing the initial correlation (two things that happen to occur at the same time often) does not allow you to conclude what caused what and more research is needed to determine likely relationships.


[0:00-5:00] JAMES WILKES LIFE

The film starts with some stories about the narrator&rsquos life and brief UFC career a decade ago and a summarized philosophy from from Bruce Lee:

  • Research your own experience
  • Absorb what is useful
  • Reject what is useless
  • Add what is specifically your own

I love Bruce Lee as much as the next gal, but his set of recommendations should not be extended to science and nutrition. I would adjust these recommendations for nutrition to the following:

  • Research quality scientific literature
  • Absorb the full consensus of the literature (do not cherry pick * articles)
  • Reject anecdote as evidence and do not assume correlations mean causation**
  • Adjust choices based on data and trade offs you are willing to make for personal p reference

Cherry Picking Explained


What does it mean to &ldquocherry pick&rdquo articles? This is a term used to describe people taking one or two single studies that support their claim and ignoring a whole other body of research that refutes it. An example would be taking the one pair of blue cherries off of this tree and proclaiming that the tree is a blue cherry tree and only produces blue cherries, when there is actually more evidence that it is a red cherry tree or at least a red and blue cherry tree. (Image used with creative commons license from skepticalscience.com).

**Correlation does not necessarily indicate a causal relationship example

Imagine you did a study of male workers at several different companies and found a positive correlation between good job performance and baldness (bald men tended to perform better at their jobs). What you cannot do here is assume that being bald caused you to perform better. There are alternative possible conclusions and more research would be needed to determine what variable was likely responsible for better performance. One example might be that older men had been working at their jobs longer, had more experience, and therefor performed better and it just so happens that older men are more likely to be bald. Another explanation might be that working long hours results in better performances but also results in high stress, which increases hair loss. There might be more possible explanations (a gene for baldness that co-inherits with a gene for good work ethic and so on). The point here is that seeing the initial correlation (two things that happen to occur at the same time often) does not allow you to conclude what caused what and more research is needed to determine likely relationships.


[0:00-5:00] JAMES WILKES LIFE

The film starts with some stories about the narrator&rsquos life and brief UFC career a decade ago and a summarized philosophy from from Bruce Lee:

  • Research your own experience
  • Absorb what is useful
  • Reject what is useless
  • Add what is specifically your own

I love Bruce Lee as much as the next gal, but his set of recommendations should not be extended to science and nutrition. I would adjust these recommendations for nutrition to the following:

  • Research quality scientific literature
  • Absorb the full consensus of the literature (do not cherry pick * articles)
  • Reject anecdote as evidence and do not assume correlations mean causation**
  • Adjust choices based on data and trade offs you are willing to make for personal p reference

Cherry Picking Explained


What does it mean to &ldquocherry pick&rdquo articles? This is a term used to describe people taking one or two single studies that support their claim and ignoring a whole other body of research that refutes it. An example would be taking the one pair of blue cherries off of this tree and proclaiming that the tree is a blue cherry tree and only produces blue cherries, when there is actually more evidence that it is a red cherry tree or at least a red and blue cherry tree. (Image used with creative commons license from skepticalscience.com).

**Correlation does not necessarily indicate a causal relationship example

Imagine you did a study of male workers at several different companies and found a positive correlation between good job performance and baldness (bald men tended to perform better at their jobs). What you cannot do here is assume that being bald caused you to perform better. There are alternative possible conclusions and more research would be needed to determine what variable was likely responsible for better performance. One example might be that older men had been working at their jobs longer, had more experience, and therefor performed better and it just so happens that older men are more likely to be bald. Another explanation might be that working long hours results in better performances but also results in high stress, which increases hair loss. There might be more possible explanations (a gene for baldness that co-inherits with a gene for good work ethic and so on). The point here is that seeing the initial correlation (two things that happen to occur at the same time often) does not allow you to conclude what caused what and more research is needed to determine likely relationships.


[0:00-5:00] JAMES WILKES LIFE

The film starts with some stories about the narrator&rsquos life and brief UFC career a decade ago and a summarized philosophy from from Bruce Lee:

  • Research your own experience
  • Absorb what is useful
  • Reject what is useless
  • Add what is specifically your own

I love Bruce Lee as much as the next gal, but his set of recommendations should not be extended to science and nutrition. I would adjust these recommendations for nutrition to the following:

  • Research quality scientific literature
  • Absorb the full consensus of the literature (do not cherry pick * articles)
  • Reject anecdote as evidence and do not assume correlations mean causation**
  • Adjust choices based on data and trade offs you are willing to make for personal p reference

Cherry Picking Explained


What does it mean to &ldquocherry pick&rdquo articles? This is a term used to describe people taking one or two single studies that support their claim and ignoring a whole other body of research that refutes it. An example would be taking the one pair of blue cherries off of this tree and proclaiming that the tree is a blue cherry tree and only produces blue cherries, when there is actually more evidence that it is a red cherry tree or at least a red and blue cherry tree. (Image used with creative commons license from skepticalscience.com).

**Correlation does not necessarily indicate a causal relationship example

Imagine you did a study of male workers at several different companies and found a positive correlation between good job performance and baldness (bald men tended to perform better at their jobs). What you cannot do here is assume that being bald caused you to perform better. There are alternative possible conclusions and more research would be needed to determine what variable was likely responsible for better performance. One example might be that older men had been working at their jobs longer, had more experience, and therefor performed better and it just so happens that older men are more likely to be bald. Another explanation might be that working long hours results in better performances but also results in high stress, which increases hair loss. There might be more possible explanations (a gene for baldness that co-inherits with a gene for good work ethic and so on). The point here is that seeing the initial correlation (two things that happen to occur at the same time often) does not allow you to conclude what caused what and more research is needed to determine likely relationships.


[0:00-5:00] JAMES WILKES LIFE

The film starts with some stories about the narrator&rsquos life and brief UFC career a decade ago and a summarized philosophy from from Bruce Lee:

  • Research your own experience
  • Absorb what is useful
  • Reject what is useless
  • Add what is specifically your own

I love Bruce Lee as much as the next gal, but his set of recommendations should not be extended to science and nutrition. I would adjust these recommendations for nutrition to the following:

  • Research quality scientific literature
  • Absorb the full consensus of the literature (do not cherry pick * articles)
  • Reject anecdote as evidence and do not assume correlations mean causation**
  • Adjust choices based on data and trade offs you are willing to make for personal p reference

Cherry Picking Explained


What does it mean to &ldquocherry pick&rdquo articles? This is a term used to describe people taking one or two single studies that support their claim and ignoring a whole other body of research that refutes it. An example would be taking the one pair of blue cherries off of this tree and proclaiming that the tree is a blue cherry tree and only produces blue cherries, when there is actually more evidence that it is a red cherry tree or at least a red and blue cherry tree. (Image used with creative commons license from skepticalscience.com).

**Correlation does not necessarily indicate a causal relationship example

Imagine you did a study of male workers at several different companies and found a positive correlation between good job performance and baldness (bald men tended to perform better at their jobs). What you cannot do here is assume that being bald caused you to perform better. There are alternative possible conclusions and more research would be needed to determine what variable was likely responsible for better performance. One example might be that older men had been working at their jobs longer, had more experience, and therefor performed better and it just so happens that older men are more likely to be bald. Another explanation might be that working long hours results in better performances but also results in high stress, which increases hair loss. There might be more possible explanations (a gene for baldness that co-inherits with a gene for good work ethic and so on). The point here is that seeing the initial correlation (two things that happen to occur at the same time often) does not allow you to conclude what caused what and more research is needed to determine likely relationships.


[0:00-5:00] JAMES WILKES LIFE

The film starts with some stories about the narrator&rsquos life and brief UFC career a decade ago and a summarized philosophy from from Bruce Lee:

  • Research your own experience
  • Absorb what is useful
  • Reject what is useless
  • Add what is specifically your own

I love Bruce Lee as much as the next gal, but his set of recommendations should not be extended to science and nutrition. I would adjust these recommendations for nutrition to the following:

  • Research quality scientific literature
  • Absorb the full consensus of the literature (do not cherry pick * articles)
  • Reject anecdote as evidence and do not assume correlations mean causation**
  • Adjust choices based on data and trade offs you are willing to make for personal p reference

Cherry Picking Explained


What does it mean to &ldquocherry pick&rdquo articles? This is a term used to describe people taking one or two single studies that support their claim and ignoring a whole other body of research that refutes it. An example would be taking the one pair of blue cherries off of this tree and proclaiming that the tree is a blue cherry tree and only produces blue cherries, when there is actually more evidence that it is a red cherry tree or at least a red and blue cherry tree. (Image used with creative commons license from skepticalscience.com).

**Correlation does not necessarily indicate a causal relationship example

Imagine you did a study of male workers at several different companies and found a positive correlation between good job performance and baldness (bald men tended to perform better at their jobs). What you cannot do here is assume that being bald caused you to perform better. There are alternative possible conclusions and more research would be needed to determine what variable was likely responsible for better performance. One example might be that older men had been working at their jobs longer, had more experience, and therefor performed better and it just so happens that older men are more likely to be bald. Another explanation might be that working long hours results in better performances but also results in high stress, which increases hair loss. There might be more possible explanations (a gene for baldness that co-inherits with a gene for good work ethic and so on). The point here is that seeing the initial correlation (two things that happen to occur at the same time often) does not allow you to conclude what caused what and more research is needed to determine likely relationships.


[0:00-5:00] JAMES WILKES LIFE

The film starts with some stories about the narrator&rsquos life and brief UFC career a decade ago and a summarized philosophy from from Bruce Lee:

  • Research your own experience
  • Absorb what is useful
  • Reject what is useless
  • Add what is specifically your own

I love Bruce Lee as much as the next gal, but his set of recommendations should not be extended to science and nutrition. I would adjust these recommendations for nutrition to the following:

  • Research quality scientific literature
  • Absorb the full consensus of the literature (do not cherry pick * articles)
  • Reject anecdote as evidence and do not assume correlations mean causation**
  • Adjust choices based on data and trade offs you are willing to make for personal p reference

Cherry Picking Explained


What does it mean to &ldquocherry pick&rdquo articles? This is a term used to describe people taking one or two single studies that support their claim and ignoring a whole other body of research that refutes it. An example would be taking the one pair of blue cherries off of this tree and proclaiming that the tree is a blue cherry tree and only produces blue cherries, when there is actually more evidence that it is a red cherry tree or at least a red and blue cherry tree. (Image used with creative commons license from skepticalscience.com).

**Correlation does not necessarily indicate a causal relationship example

Imagine you did a study of male workers at several different companies and found a positive correlation between good job performance and baldness (bald men tended to perform better at their jobs). What you cannot do here is assume that being bald caused you to perform better. There are alternative possible conclusions and more research would be needed to determine what variable was likely responsible for better performance. One example might be that older men had been working at their jobs longer, had more experience, and therefor performed better and it just so happens that older men are more likely to be bald. Another explanation might be that working long hours results in better performances but also results in high stress, which increases hair loss. There might be more possible explanations (a gene for baldness that co-inherits with a gene for good work ethic and so on). The point here is that seeing the initial correlation (two things that happen to occur at the same time often) does not allow you to conclude what caused what and more research is needed to determine likely relationships.


Watch the video: NFL Warns Players NOT to Eat Meat in Mexico, China (January 2022).