Traditional recipes

How Health Professionals Spend New Year’s Eve

How Health Professionals Spend New Year’s Eve

Start taking notes before the ball drops

There are ways to celebrate without throwing away all of your healthy habits.

It’s the night before you kick off your resolution. Instead, go into New Year’s Eve in hopes of celebrating the year that passed and starting a healthy year ahead.

Click here for the How Health Professionals Spend New Year’s Eve slideshow.

Health professionals happen to be more normal than you think and they enjoy eating sweets and drinking alcohol every once in a while. Instead of feeling guilty, they prepare for special nights, such as New Year’s Eve, and choose to not overdo it. They plan for success by bringing along their own appetizers, desserts, and even cocktail sweetener. We spoke with three health professionals about how to spend New Year’s Eve the healthy way.


20 New Year's Food Traditions That'll Bring You Good Luck in 2021

People put their own spin on New Year's, but food is the one thing they have in common, and you'll want to try all of these lucky foods for the new year.

Around the world, people welcome a new year in different ways. From incomparable firework shows in Australia to water gun fights in the streets of Thailand, commemorating the new year comes in many ways, shapes, and forms. But one thing that all celebrations have in common? Food. Whether you're feasting on your favorite meal or munching on foods that'll bring you good luck in the new year, there are countless New Year's Eve food traditions that people follow worldwide in hopes of starting the next chapter of their lives on the right foot. Some traditions call for noodles, while others call for cakes, but regardless of how different the meals may be, in one way or another, most New Year's food traditions signify forward movement, prosperity, and health.

After a year like 2020 that's had so many heartbreaks, disappointments, and hardships, primarily due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, welcoming a new year is bound to feel even sweeter than usual. With newly introduced and approved vaccines on the horizon, 2021 can feel like the breath of fresh air most of the world has been longing for since March. But for the time being, the coronavirus rages on, reaching new, record-breaking numbers of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths every day, which is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising against large gatherings this holiday season. So, while your annual New Year's Eve party may be out of the question, you and your quaranteam can still celebrate the new year in your own way, like throwing a taste-testing party complete with New Year's Eve food traditions from around the world. And though you may not believe that what you eat on Dec. 31 can play a part in the next year of your life, a little extra good fortune in 2021 can't hurt, and what better way to get that than by trying some of these lucky foods for the new year?

Before the clock strikes midnight on Dec. 31, people in Spain and Spanish-speaking countries around the world partake in a tradition called las doce uvas de la suerte, the 12 lucky grapes. The goal is to eat all 12 before midnight, if you want to have good luck in the new year, according to NPR.

According to CNN, Kransekage is a wreath cake tower that consists of multiple rings of cake piled on top of one another. The desserts are a part of Norway and Denmark's New Year's Eve traditions. The cake is made with marzipan, is often build around a bottle of wine or Aquavit in the center, and can be decorated for any special occasion.

The taste and ingredients of Tteokguk, a.k.a. Korea's New Year Soup, vary by region. But, generally, its base is made with a protein broth in a soy-sauce seasoned stock, then cylindrical rice cakes are added to the soup. According to the Culture Trip, Tteokguk is one of the many foods prepared as an offering to the family's ancestors on Seollal, the Korean New Year. It's said that someone cannot become a year older until they've had their bowl of tteokguk.

One of France's new year traditions actually takes place a few days after Jan. 1. According to France 24, a Paris-based news network, the galette des rois, or kings cake, is traditionally eaten on the first Sunday of the year to celebrate the Epiphany in Christianity. The cake is often made with puff pastry and frangipane, an almond-flavored cream or paste but they can be filled with plenty of other sweets instead. Regardless of its filling, the galette des rois always hides the coveted, fève, or bean, a ceramic trinket or charm, and the person who finds it is graced with good luck.

Tamales are a traditional Mexican dish made from corn dough stuffed with meat, cheese, and anything else you could possibly want, and then wrapped in a banana leaf or corn husk. Though tamales are eaten year-round and most special occasions, they take on a special meaning during the holiday season. CNN reported that families gather together to make tamales, assigning one aspect of the cooking process to each individual person. On New Year's tamales are served with menudo, a tripe and hominy soup.

These Dutch treats are made from frying small balls of dough stuffed with raisins or currants in a pan of hot oil, hence the name Oliebollen, or oil balls, the Dutch Review, a Netherlands magazine, reported. Known in the United States as Dutch Doughnuts, oliebollen are topped with powdered sugar and can be made with other ingredients, like cinnamon or apple pieces. The dessert is often eaten on New Year's Eve and washed down with champagne.

According to The Culture Trip, Kuku sabzi is type of frittata made with eggs and fresh herbs. The dish is traditionally served at Nowruz, the Iranian New Year, which takes place during the spring equinox. Kuku sabzi promises of fertility and abundance in the upcoming year.

The Bulgarian banitsa is one of the many round cakes eaten around the world on New Year's Eve. The shape signifies that the old year has come to and end, and the new year gives you a chance to start fresh, according to Bulgaria National Radio. The banitsa is traditionally made with filo pastry, eggs, and fat, but recipes vary in different parts of the country. Regardless of where you go, however, you'll always find twigs or other sticks placed inside the dish, each one representing well wishes for your relatives.

While this New Year's Eve food tradition doesn't involve eating, it is something that people in El Salvador do each year. A minute before midnight, each family member cracks an egg into a glass of water, The Culture Trip reported, and let them sit overnight. The following morning, the shape of the egg gives you a clue about what your future holds.

According to Latin media company we are mitú, the Roscas de Reyes, king's wreath, is a brioche-style cake, filled and topped with candied fruits. The cake is often paired with traditional Mexican hot chocolate, which highlights the indigenous origins of chocolate. Inside the Roscas, you'll find at least one, if not more, babies representing the newly born Jesus Christ.

In China, Japan and other Asian countries, it's customary to eat long noodles, which signify longevity, on New Year's Day and during the Lunar New Year, according to Washington Post. Since the noodles are never to be broken or shortened during the cooking process, the typical preparation for "Long-Life Noodles" is a stir-fry.


20 New Year's Food Traditions That'll Bring You Good Luck in 2021

People put their own spin on New Year's, but food is the one thing they have in common, and you'll want to try all of these lucky foods for the new year.

Around the world, people welcome a new year in different ways. From incomparable firework shows in Australia to water gun fights in the streets of Thailand, commemorating the new year comes in many ways, shapes, and forms. But one thing that all celebrations have in common? Food. Whether you're feasting on your favorite meal or munching on foods that'll bring you good luck in the new year, there are countless New Year's Eve food traditions that people follow worldwide in hopes of starting the next chapter of their lives on the right foot. Some traditions call for noodles, while others call for cakes, but regardless of how different the meals may be, in one way or another, most New Year's food traditions signify forward movement, prosperity, and health.

After a year like 2020 that's had so many heartbreaks, disappointments, and hardships, primarily due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, welcoming a new year is bound to feel even sweeter than usual. With newly introduced and approved vaccines on the horizon, 2021 can feel like the breath of fresh air most of the world has been longing for since March. But for the time being, the coronavirus rages on, reaching new, record-breaking numbers of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths every day, which is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising against large gatherings this holiday season. So, while your annual New Year's Eve party may be out of the question, you and your quaranteam can still celebrate the new year in your own way, like throwing a taste-testing party complete with New Year's Eve food traditions from around the world. And though you may not believe that what you eat on Dec. 31 can play a part in the next year of your life, a little extra good fortune in 2021 can't hurt, and what better way to get that than by trying some of these lucky foods for the new year?

Before the clock strikes midnight on Dec. 31, people in Spain and Spanish-speaking countries around the world partake in a tradition called las doce uvas de la suerte, the 12 lucky grapes. The goal is to eat all 12 before midnight, if you want to have good luck in the new year, according to NPR.

According to CNN, Kransekage is a wreath cake tower that consists of multiple rings of cake piled on top of one another. The desserts are a part of Norway and Denmark's New Year's Eve traditions. The cake is made with marzipan, is often build around a bottle of wine or Aquavit in the center, and can be decorated for any special occasion.

The taste and ingredients of Tteokguk, a.k.a. Korea's New Year Soup, vary by region. But, generally, its base is made with a protein broth in a soy-sauce seasoned stock, then cylindrical rice cakes are added to the soup. According to the Culture Trip, Tteokguk is one of the many foods prepared as an offering to the family's ancestors on Seollal, the Korean New Year. It's said that someone cannot become a year older until they've had their bowl of tteokguk.

One of France's new year traditions actually takes place a few days after Jan. 1. According to France 24, a Paris-based news network, the galette des rois, or kings cake, is traditionally eaten on the first Sunday of the year to celebrate the Epiphany in Christianity. The cake is often made with puff pastry and frangipane, an almond-flavored cream or paste but they can be filled with plenty of other sweets instead. Regardless of its filling, the galette des rois always hides the coveted, fève, or bean, a ceramic trinket or charm, and the person who finds it is graced with good luck.

Tamales are a traditional Mexican dish made from corn dough stuffed with meat, cheese, and anything else you could possibly want, and then wrapped in a banana leaf or corn husk. Though tamales are eaten year-round and most special occasions, they take on a special meaning during the holiday season. CNN reported that families gather together to make tamales, assigning one aspect of the cooking process to each individual person. On New Year's tamales are served with menudo, a tripe and hominy soup.

These Dutch treats are made from frying small balls of dough stuffed with raisins or currants in a pan of hot oil, hence the name Oliebollen, or oil balls, the Dutch Review, a Netherlands magazine, reported. Known in the United States as Dutch Doughnuts, oliebollen are topped with powdered sugar and can be made with other ingredients, like cinnamon or apple pieces. The dessert is often eaten on New Year's Eve and washed down with champagne.

According to The Culture Trip, Kuku sabzi is type of frittata made with eggs and fresh herbs. The dish is traditionally served at Nowruz, the Iranian New Year, which takes place during the spring equinox. Kuku sabzi promises of fertility and abundance in the upcoming year.

The Bulgarian banitsa is one of the many round cakes eaten around the world on New Year's Eve. The shape signifies that the old year has come to and end, and the new year gives you a chance to start fresh, according to Bulgaria National Radio. The banitsa is traditionally made with filo pastry, eggs, and fat, but recipes vary in different parts of the country. Regardless of where you go, however, you'll always find twigs or other sticks placed inside the dish, each one representing well wishes for your relatives.

While this New Year's Eve food tradition doesn't involve eating, it is something that people in El Salvador do each year. A minute before midnight, each family member cracks an egg into a glass of water, The Culture Trip reported, and let them sit overnight. The following morning, the shape of the egg gives you a clue about what your future holds.

According to Latin media company we are mitú, the Roscas de Reyes, king's wreath, is a brioche-style cake, filled and topped with candied fruits. The cake is often paired with traditional Mexican hot chocolate, which highlights the indigenous origins of chocolate. Inside the Roscas, you'll find at least one, if not more, babies representing the newly born Jesus Christ.

In China, Japan and other Asian countries, it's customary to eat long noodles, which signify longevity, on New Year's Day and during the Lunar New Year, according to Washington Post. Since the noodles are never to be broken or shortened during the cooking process, the typical preparation for "Long-Life Noodles" is a stir-fry.


20 New Year's Food Traditions That'll Bring You Good Luck in 2021

People put their own spin on New Year's, but food is the one thing they have in common, and you'll want to try all of these lucky foods for the new year.

Around the world, people welcome a new year in different ways. From incomparable firework shows in Australia to water gun fights in the streets of Thailand, commemorating the new year comes in many ways, shapes, and forms. But one thing that all celebrations have in common? Food. Whether you're feasting on your favorite meal or munching on foods that'll bring you good luck in the new year, there are countless New Year's Eve food traditions that people follow worldwide in hopes of starting the next chapter of their lives on the right foot. Some traditions call for noodles, while others call for cakes, but regardless of how different the meals may be, in one way or another, most New Year's food traditions signify forward movement, prosperity, and health.

After a year like 2020 that's had so many heartbreaks, disappointments, and hardships, primarily due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, welcoming a new year is bound to feel even sweeter than usual. With newly introduced and approved vaccines on the horizon, 2021 can feel like the breath of fresh air most of the world has been longing for since March. But for the time being, the coronavirus rages on, reaching new, record-breaking numbers of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths every day, which is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising against large gatherings this holiday season. So, while your annual New Year's Eve party may be out of the question, you and your quaranteam can still celebrate the new year in your own way, like throwing a taste-testing party complete with New Year's Eve food traditions from around the world. And though you may not believe that what you eat on Dec. 31 can play a part in the next year of your life, a little extra good fortune in 2021 can't hurt, and what better way to get that than by trying some of these lucky foods for the new year?

Before the clock strikes midnight on Dec. 31, people in Spain and Spanish-speaking countries around the world partake in a tradition called las doce uvas de la suerte, the 12 lucky grapes. The goal is to eat all 12 before midnight, if you want to have good luck in the new year, according to NPR.

According to CNN, Kransekage is a wreath cake tower that consists of multiple rings of cake piled on top of one another. The desserts are a part of Norway and Denmark's New Year's Eve traditions. The cake is made with marzipan, is often build around a bottle of wine or Aquavit in the center, and can be decorated for any special occasion.

The taste and ingredients of Tteokguk, a.k.a. Korea's New Year Soup, vary by region. But, generally, its base is made with a protein broth in a soy-sauce seasoned stock, then cylindrical rice cakes are added to the soup. According to the Culture Trip, Tteokguk is one of the many foods prepared as an offering to the family's ancestors on Seollal, the Korean New Year. It's said that someone cannot become a year older until they've had their bowl of tteokguk.

One of France's new year traditions actually takes place a few days after Jan. 1. According to France 24, a Paris-based news network, the galette des rois, or kings cake, is traditionally eaten on the first Sunday of the year to celebrate the Epiphany in Christianity. The cake is often made with puff pastry and frangipane, an almond-flavored cream or paste but they can be filled with plenty of other sweets instead. Regardless of its filling, the galette des rois always hides the coveted, fève, or bean, a ceramic trinket or charm, and the person who finds it is graced with good luck.

Tamales are a traditional Mexican dish made from corn dough stuffed with meat, cheese, and anything else you could possibly want, and then wrapped in a banana leaf or corn husk. Though tamales are eaten year-round and most special occasions, they take on a special meaning during the holiday season. CNN reported that families gather together to make tamales, assigning one aspect of the cooking process to each individual person. On New Year's tamales are served with menudo, a tripe and hominy soup.

These Dutch treats are made from frying small balls of dough stuffed with raisins or currants in a pan of hot oil, hence the name Oliebollen, or oil balls, the Dutch Review, a Netherlands magazine, reported. Known in the United States as Dutch Doughnuts, oliebollen are topped with powdered sugar and can be made with other ingredients, like cinnamon or apple pieces. The dessert is often eaten on New Year's Eve and washed down with champagne.

According to The Culture Trip, Kuku sabzi is type of frittata made with eggs and fresh herbs. The dish is traditionally served at Nowruz, the Iranian New Year, which takes place during the spring equinox. Kuku sabzi promises of fertility and abundance in the upcoming year.

The Bulgarian banitsa is one of the many round cakes eaten around the world on New Year's Eve. The shape signifies that the old year has come to and end, and the new year gives you a chance to start fresh, according to Bulgaria National Radio. The banitsa is traditionally made with filo pastry, eggs, and fat, but recipes vary in different parts of the country. Regardless of where you go, however, you'll always find twigs or other sticks placed inside the dish, each one representing well wishes for your relatives.

While this New Year's Eve food tradition doesn't involve eating, it is something that people in El Salvador do each year. A minute before midnight, each family member cracks an egg into a glass of water, The Culture Trip reported, and let them sit overnight. The following morning, the shape of the egg gives you a clue about what your future holds.

According to Latin media company we are mitú, the Roscas de Reyes, king's wreath, is a brioche-style cake, filled and topped with candied fruits. The cake is often paired with traditional Mexican hot chocolate, which highlights the indigenous origins of chocolate. Inside the Roscas, you'll find at least one, if not more, babies representing the newly born Jesus Christ.

In China, Japan and other Asian countries, it's customary to eat long noodles, which signify longevity, on New Year's Day and during the Lunar New Year, according to Washington Post. Since the noodles are never to be broken or shortened during the cooking process, the typical preparation for "Long-Life Noodles" is a stir-fry.


20 New Year's Food Traditions That'll Bring You Good Luck in 2021

People put their own spin on New Year's, but food is the one thing they have in common, and you'll want to try all of these lucky foods for the new year.

Around the world, people welcome a new year in different ways. From incomparable firework shows in Australia to water gun fights in the streets of Thailand, commemorating the new year comes in many ways, shapes, and forms. But one thing that all celebrations have in common? Food. Whether you're feasting on your favorite meal or munching on foods that'll bring you good luck in the new year, there are countless New Year's Eve food traditions that people follow worldwide in hopes of starting the next chapter of their lives on the right foot. Some traditions call for noodles, while others call for cakes, but regardless of how different the meals may be, in one way or another, most New Year's food traditions signify forward movement, prosperity, and health.

After a year like 2020 that's had so many heartbreaks, disappointments, and hardships, primarily due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, welcoming a new year is bound to feel even sweeter than usual. With newly introduced and approved vaccines on the horizon, 2021 can feel like the breath of fresh air most of the world has been longing for since March. But for the time being, the coronavirus rages on, reaching new, record-breaking numbers of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths every day, which is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising against large gatherings this holiday season. So, while your annual New Year's Eve party may be out of the question, you and your quaranteam can still celebrate the new year in your own way, like throwing a taste-testing party complete with New Year's Eve food traditions from around the world. And though you may not believe that what you eat on Dec. 31 can play a part in the next year of your life, a little extra good fortune in 2021 can't hurt, and what better way to get that than by trying some of these lucky foods for the new year?

Before the clock strikes midnight on Dec. 31, people in Spain and Spanish-speaking countries around the world partake in a tradition called las doce uvas de la suerte, the 12 lucky grapes. The goal is to eat all 12 before midnight, if you want to have good luck in the new year, according to NPR.

According to CNN, Kransekage is a wreath cake tower that consists of multiple rings of cake piled on top of one another. The desserts are a part of Norway and Denmark's New Year's Eve traditions. The cake is made with marzipan, is often build around a bottle of wine or Aquavit in the center, and can be decorated for any special occasion.

The taste and ingredients of Tteokguk, a.k.a. Korea's New Year Soup, vary by region. But, generally, its base is made with a protein broth in a soy-sauce seasoned stock, then cylindrical rice cakes are added to the soup. According to the Culture Trip, Tteokguk is one of the many foods prepared as an offering to the family's ancestors on Seollal, the Korean New Year. It's said that someone cannot become a year older until they've had their bowl of tteokguk.

One of France's new year traditions actually takes place a few days after Jan. 1. According to France 24, a Paris-based news network, the galette des rois, or kings cake, is traditionally eaten on the first Sunday of the year to celebrate the Epiphany in Christianity. The cake is often made with puff pastry and frangipane, an almond-flavored cream or paste but they can be filled with plenty of other sweets instead. Regardless of its filling, the galette des rois always hides the coveted, fève, or bean, a ceramic trinket or charm, and the person who finds it is graced with good luck.

Tamales are a traditional Mexican dish made from corn dough stuffed with meat, cheese, and anything else you could possibly want, and then wrapped in a banana leaf or corn husk. Though tamales are eaten year-round and most special occasions, they take on a special meaning during the holiday season. CNN reported that families gather together to make tamales, assigning one aspect of the cooking process to each individual person. On New Year's tamales are served with menudo, a tripe and hominy soup.

These Dutch treats are made from frying small balls of dough stuffed with raisins or currants in a pan of hot oil, hence the name Oliebollen, or oil balls, the Dutch Review, a Netherlands magazine, reported. Known in the United States as Dutch Doughnuts, oliebollen are topped with powdered sugar and can be made with other ingredients, like cinnamon or apple pieces. The dessert is often eaten on New Year's Eve and washed down with champagne.

According to The Culture Trip, Kuku sabzi is type of frittata made with eggs and fresh herbs. The dish is traditionally served at Nowruz, the Iranian New Year, which takes place during the spring equinox. Kuku sabzi promises of fertility and abundance in the upcoming year.

The Bulgarian banitsa is one of the many round cakes eaten around the world on New Year's Eve. The shape signifies that the old year has come to and end, and the new year gives you a chance to start fresh, according to Bulgaria National Radio. The banitsa is traditionally made with filo pastry, eggs, and fat, but recipes vary in different parts of the country. Regardless of where you go, however, you'll always find twigs or other sticks placed inside the dish, each one representing well wishes for your relatives.

While this New Year's Eve food tradition doesn't involve eating, it is something that people in El Salvador do each year. A minute before midnight, each family member cracks an egg into a glass of water, The Culture Trip reported, and let them sit overnight. The following morning, the shape of the egg gives you a clue about what your future holds.

According to Latin media company we are mitú, the Roscas de Reyes, king's wreath, is a brioche-style cake, filled and topped with candied fruits. The cake is often paired with traditional Mexican hot chocolate, which highlights the indigenous origins of chocolate. Inside the Roscas, you'll find at least one, if not more, babies representing the newly born Jesus Christ.

In China, Japan and other Asian countries, it's customary to eat long noodles, which signify longevity, on New Year's Day and during the Lunar New Year, according to Washington Post. Since the noodles are never to be broken or shortened during the cooking process, the typical preparation for "Long-Life Noodles" is a stir-fry.


20 New Year's Food Traditions That'll Bring You Good Luck in 2021

People put their own spin on New Year's, but food is the one thing they have in common, and you'll want to try all of these lucky foods for the new year.

Around the world, people welcome a new year in different ways. From incomparable firework shows in Australia to water gun fights in the streets of Thailand, commemorating the new year comes in many ways, shapes, and forms. But one thing that all celebrations have in common? Food. Whether you're feasting on your favorite meal or munching on foods that'll bring you good luck in the new year, there are countless New Year's Eve food traditions that people follow worldwide in hopes of starting the next chapter of their lives on the right foot. Some traditions call for noodles, while others call for cakes, but regardless of how different the meals may be, in one way or another, most New Year's food traditions signify forward movement, prosperity, and health.

After a year like 2020 that's had so many heartbreaks, disappointments, and hardships, primarily due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, welcoming a new year is bound to feel even sweeter than usual. With newly introduced and approved vaccines on the horizon, 2021 can feel like the breath of fresh air most of the world has been longing for since March. But for the time being, the coronavirus rages on, reaching new, record-breaking numbers of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths every day, which is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising against large gatherings this holiday season. So, while your annual New Year's Eve party may be out of the question, you and your quaranteam can still celebrate the new year in your own way, like throwing a taste-testing party complete with New Year's Eve food traditions from around the world. And though you may not believe that what you eat on Dec. 31 can play a part in the next year of your life, a little extra good fortune in 2021 can't hurt, and what better way to get that than by trying some of these lucky foods for the new year?

Before the clock strikes midnight on Dec. 31, people in Spain and Spanish-speaking countries around the world partake in a tradition called las doce uvas de la suerte, the 12 lucky grapes. The goal is to eat all 12 before midnight, if you want to have good luck in the new year, according to NPR.

According to CNN, Kransekage is a wreath cake tower that consists of multiple rings of cake piled on top of one another. The desserts are a part of Norway and Denmark's New Year's Eve traditions. The cake is made with marzipan, is often build around a bottle of wine or Aquavit in the center, and can be decorated for any special occasion.

The taste and ingredients of Tteokguk, a.k.a. Korea's New Year Soup, vary by region. But, generally, its base is made with a protein broth in a soy-sauce seasoned stock, then cylindrical rice cakes are added to the soup. According to the Culture Trip, Tteokguk is one of the many foods prepared as an offering to the family's ancestors on Seollal, the Korean New Year. It's said that someone cannot become a year older until they've had their bowl of tteokguk.

One of France's new year traditions actually takes place a few days after Jan. 1. According to France 24, a Paris-based news network, the galette des rois, or kings cake, is traditionally eaten on the first Sunday of the year to celebrate the Epiphany in Christianity. The cake is often made with puff pastry and frangipane, an almond-flavored cream or paste but they can be filled with plenty of other sweets instead. Regardless of its filling, the galette des rois always hides the coveted, fève, or bean, a ceramic trinket or charm, and the person who finds it is graced with good luck.

Tamales are a traditional Mexican dish made from corn dough stuffed with meat, cheese, and anything else you could possibly want, and then wrapped in a banana leaf or corn husk. Though tamales are eaten year-round and most special occasions, they take on a special meaning during the holiday season. CNN reported that families gather together to make tamales, assigning one aspect of the cooking process to each individual person. On New Year's tamales are served with menudo, a tripe and hominy soup.

These Dutch treats are made from frying small balls of dough stuffed with raisins or currants in a pan of hot oil, hence the name Oliebollen, or oil balls, the Dutch Review, a Netherlands magazine, reported. Known in the United States as Dutch Doughnuts, oliebollen are topped with powdered sugar and can be made with other ingredients, like cinnamon or apple pieces. The dessert is often eaten on New Year's Eve and washed down with champagne.

According to The Culture Trip, Kuku sabzi is type of frittata made with eggs and fresh herbs. The dish is traditionally served at Nowruz, the Iranian New Year, which takes place during the spring equinox. Kuku sabzi promises of fertility and abundance in the upcoming year.

The Bulgarian banitsa is one of the many round cakes eaten around the world on New Year's Eve. The shape signifies that the old year has come to and end, and the new year gives you a chance to start fresh, according to Bulgaria National Radio. The banitsa is traditionally made with filo pastry, eggs, and fat, but recipes vary in different parts of the country. Regardless of where you go, however, you'll always find twigs or other sticks placed inside the dish, each one representing well wishes for your relatives.

While this New Year's Eve food tradition doesn't involve eating, it is something that people in El Salvador do each year. A minute before midnight, each family member cracks an egg into a glass of water, The Culture Trip reported, and let them sit overnight. The following morning, the shape of the egg gives you a clue about what your future holds.

According to Latin media company we are mitú, the Roscas de Reyes, king's wreath, is a brioche-style cake, filled and topped with candied fruits. The cake is often paired with traditional Mexican hot chocolate, which highlights the indigenous origins of chocolate. Inside the Roscas, you'll find at least one, if not more, babies representing the newly born Jesus Christ.

In China, Japan and other Asian countries, it's customary to eat long noodles, which signify longevity, on New Year's Day and during the Lunar New Year, according to Washington Post. Since the noodles are never to be broken or shortened during the cooking process, the typical preparation for "Long-Life Noodles" is a stir-fry.


20 New Year's Food Traditions That'll Bring You Good Luck in 2021

People put their own spin on New Year's, but food is the one thing they have in common, and you'll want to try all of these lucky foods for the new year.

Around the world, people welcome a new year in different ways. From incomparable firework shows in Australia to water gun fights in the streets of Thailand, commemorating the new year comes in many ways, shapes, and forms. But one thing that all celebrations have in common? Food. Whether you're feasting on your favorite meal or munching on foods that'll bring you good luck in the new year, there are countless New Year's Eve food traditions that people follow worldwide in hopes of starting the next chapter of their lives on the right foot. Some traditions call for noodles, while others call for cakes, but regardless of how different the meals may be, in one way or another, most New Year's food traditions signify forward movement, prosperity, and health.

After a year like 2020 that's had so many heartbreaks, disappointments, and hardships, primarily due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, welcoming a new year is bound to feel even sweeter than usual. With newly introduced and approved vaccines on the horizon, 2021 can feel like the breath of fresh air most of the world has been longing for since March. But for the time being, the coronavirus rages on, reaching new, record-breaking numbers of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths every day, which is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising against large gatherings this holiday season. So, while your annual New Year's Eve party may be out of the question, you and your quaranteam can still celebrate the new year in your own way, like throwing a taste-testing party complete with New Year's Eve food traditions from around the world. And though you may not believe that what you eat on Dec. 31 can play a part in the next year of your life, a little extra good fortune in 2021 can't hurt, and what better way to get that than by trying some of these lucky foods for the new year?

Before the clock strikes midnight on Dec. 31, people in Spain and Spanish-speaking countries around the world partake in a tradition called las doce uvas de la suerte, the 12 lucky grapes. The goal is to eat all 12 before midnight, if you want to have good luck in the new year, according to NPR.

According to CNN, Kransekage is a wreath cake tower that consists of multiple rings of cake piled on top of one another. The desserts are a part of Norway and Denmark's New Year's Eve traditions. The cake is made with marzipan, is often build around a bottle of wine or Aquavit in the center, and can be decorated for any special occasion.

The taste and ingredients of Tteokguk, a.k.a. Korea's New Year Soup, vary by region. But, generally, its base is made with a protein broth in a soy-sauce seasoned stock, then cylindrical rice cakes are added to the soup. According to the Culture Trip, Tteokguk is one of the many foods prepared as an offering to the family's ancestors on Seollal, the Korean New Year. It's said that someone cannot become a year older until they've had their bowl of tteokguk.

One of France's new year traditions actually takes place a few days after Jan. 1. According to France 24, a Paris-based news network, the galette des rois, or kings cake, is traditionally eaten on the first Sunday of the year to celebrate the Epiphany in Christianity. The cake is often made with puff pastry and frangipane, an almond-flavored cream or paste but they can be filled with plenty of other sweets instead. Regardless of its filling, the galette des rois always hides the coveted, fève, or bean, a ceramic trinket or charm, and the person who finds it is graced with good luck.

Tamales are a traditional Mexican dish made from corn dough stuffed with meat, cheese, and anything else you could possibly want, and then wrapped in a banana leaf or corn husk. Though tamales are eaten year-round and most special occasions, they take on a special meaning during the holiday season. CNN reported that families gather together to make tamales, assigning one aspect of the cooking process to each individual person. On New Year's tamales are served with menudo, a tripe and hominy soup.

These Dutch treats are made from frying small balls of dough stuffed with raisins or currants in a pan of hot oil, hence the name Oliebollen, or oil balls, the Dutch Review, a Netherlands magazine, reported. Known in the United States as Dutch Doughnuts, oliebollen are topped with powdered sugar and can be made with other ingredients, like cinnamon or apple pieces. The dessert is often eaten on New Year's Eve and washed down with champagne.

According to The Culture Trip, Kuku sabzi is type of frittata made with eggs and fresh herbs. The dish is traditionally served at Nowruz, the Iranian New Year, which takes place during the spring equinox. Kuku sabzi promises of fertility and abundance in the upcoming year.

The Bulgarian banitsa is one of the many round cakes eaten around the world on New Year's Eve. The shape signifies that the old year has come to and end, and the new year gives you a chance to start fresh, according to Bulgaria National Radio. The banitsa is traditionally made with filo pastry, eggs, and fat, but recipes vary in different parts of the country. Regardless of where you go, however, you'll always find twigs or other sticks placed inside the dish, each one representing well wishes for your relatives.

While this New Year's Eve food tradition doesn't involve eating, it is something that people in El Salvador do each year. A minute before midnight, each family member cracks an egg into a glass of water, The Culture Trip reported, and let them sit overnight. The following morning, the shape of the egg gives you a clue about what your future holds.

According to Latin media company we are mitú, the Roscas de Reyes, king's wreath, is a brioche-style cake, filled and topped with candied fruits. The cake is often paired with traditional Mexican hot chocolate, which highlights the indigenous origins of chocolate. Inside the Roscas, you'll find at least one, if not more, babies representing the newly born Jesus Christ.

In China, Japan and other Asian countries, it's customary to eat long noodles, which signify longevity, on New Year's Day and during the Lunar New Year, according to Washington Post. Since the noodles are never to be broken or shortened during the cooking process, the typical preparation for "Long-Life Noodles" is a stir-fry.


20 New Year's Food Traditions That'll Bring You Good Luck in 2021

People put their own spin on New Year's, but food is the one thing they have in common, and you'll want to try all of these lucky foods for the new year.

Around the world, people welcome a new year in different ways. From incomparable firework shows in Australia to water gun fights in the streets of Thailand, commemorating the new year comes in many ways, shapes, and forms. But one thing that all celebrations have in common? Food. Whether you're feasting on your favorite meal or munching on foods that'll bring you good luck in the new year, there are countless New Year's Eve food traditions that people follow worldwide in hopes of starting the next chapter of their lives on the right foot. Some traditions call for noodles, while others call for cakes, but regardless of how different the meals may be, in one way or another, most New Year's food traditions signify forward movement, prosperity, and health.

After a year like 2020 that's had so many heartbreaks, disappointments, and hardships, primarily due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, welcoming a new year is bound to feel even sweeter than usual. With newly introduced and approved vaccines on the horizon, 2021 can feel like the breath of fresh air most of the world has been longing for since March. But for the time being, the coronavirus rages on, reaching new, record-breaking numbers of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths every day, which is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising against large gatherings this holiday season. So, while your annual New Year's Eve party may be out of the question, you and your quaranteam can still celebrate the new year in your own way, like throwing a taste-testing party complete with New Year's Eve food traditions from around the world. And though you may not believe that what you eat on Dec. 31 can play a part in the next year of your life, a little extra good fortune in 2021 can't hurt, and what better way to get that than by trying some of these lucky foods for the new year?

Before the clock strikes midnight on Dec. 31, people in Spain and Spanish-speaking countries around the world partake in a tradition called las doce uvas de la suerte, the 12 lucky grapes. The goal is to eat all 12 before midnight, if you want to have good luck in the new year, according to NPR.

According to CNN, Kransekage is a wreath cake tower that consists of multiple rings of cake piled on top of one another. The desserts are a part of Norway and Denmark's New Year's Eve traditions. The cake is made with marzipan, is often build around a bottle of wine or Aquavit in the center, and can be decorated for any special occasion.

The taste and ingredients of Tteokguk, a.k.a. Korea's New Year Soup, vary by region. But, generally, its base is made with a protein broth in a soy-sauce seasoned stock, then cylindrical rice cakes are added to the soup. According to the Culture Trip, Tteokguk is one of the many foods prepared as an offering to the family's ancestors on Seollal, the Korean New Year. It's said that someone cannot become a year older until they've had their bowl of tteokguk.

One of France's new year traditions actually takes place a few days after Jan. 1. According to France 24, a Paris-based news network, the galette des rois, or kings cake, is traditionally eaten on the first Sunday of the year to celebrate the Epiphany in Christianity. The cake is often made with puff pastry and frangipane, an almond-flavored cream or paste but they can be filled with plenty of other sweets instead. Regardless of its filling, the galette des rois always hides the coveted, fève, or bean, a ceramic trinket or charm, and the person who finds it is graced with good luck.

Tamales are a traditional Mexican dish made from corn dough stuffed with meat, cheese, and anything else you could possibly want, and then wrapped in a banana leaf or corn husk. Though tamales are eaten year-round and most special occasions, they take on a special meaning during the holiday season. CNN reported that families gather together to make tamales, assigning one aspect of the cooking process to each individual person. On New Year's tamales are served with menudo, a tripe and hominy soup.

These Dutch treats are made from frying small balls of dough stuffed with raisins or currants in a pan of hot oil, hence the name Oliebollen, or oil balls, the Dutch Review, a Netherlands magazine, reported. Known in the United States as Dutch Doughnuts, oliebollen are topped with powdered sugar and can be made with other ingredients, like cinnamon or apple pieces. The dessert is often eaten on New Year's Eve and washed down with champagne.

According to The Culture Trip, Kuku sabzi is type of frittata made with eggs and fresh herbs. The dish is traditionally served at Nowruz, the Iranian New Year, which takes place during the spring equinox. Kuku sabzi promises of fertility and abundance in the upcoming year.

The Bulgarian banitsa is one of the many round cakes eaten around the world on New Year's Eve. The shape signifies that the old year has come to and end, and the new year gives you a chance to start fresh, according to Bulgaria National Radio. The banitsa is traditionally made with filo pastry, eggs, and fat, but recipes vary in different parts of the country. Regardless of where you go, however, you'll always find twigs or other sticks placed inside the dish, each one representing well wishes for your relatives.

While this New Year's Eve food tradition doesn't involve eating, it is something that people in El Salvador do each year. A minute before midnight, each family member cracks an egg into a glass of water, The Culture Trip reported, and let them sit overnight. The following morning, the shape of the egg gives you a clue about what your future holds.

According to Latin media company we are mitú, the Roscas de Reyes, king's wreath, is a brioche-style cake, filled and topped with candied fruits. The cake is often paired with traditional Mexican hot chocolate, which highlights the indigenous origins of chocolate. Inside the Roscas, you'll find at least one, if not more, babies representing the newly born Jesus Christ.

In China, Japan and other Asian countries, it's customary to eat long noodles, which signify longevity, on New Year's Day and during the Lunar New Year, according to Washington Post. Since the noodles are never to be broken or shortened during the cooking process, the typical preparation for "Long-Life Noodles" is a stir-fry.


20 New Year's Food Traditions That'll Bring You Good Luck in 2021

People put their own spin on New Year's, but food is the one thing they have in common, and you'll want to try all of these lucky foods for the new year.

Around the world, people welcome a new year in different ways. From incomparable firework shows in Australia to water gun fights in the streets of Thailand, commemorating the new year comes in many ways, shapes, and forms. But one thing that all celebrations have in common? Food. Whether you're feasting on your favorite meal or munching on foods that'll bring you good luck in the new year, there are countless New Year's Eve food traditions that people follow worldwide in hopes of starting the next chapter of their lives on the right foot. Some traditions call for noodles, while others call for cakes, but regardless of how different the meals may be, in one way or another, most New Year's food traditions signify forward movement, prosperity, and health.

After a year like 2020 that's had so many heartbreaks, disappointments, and hardships, primarily due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, welcoming a new year is bound to feel even sweeter than usual. With newly introduced and approved vaccines on the horizon, 2021 can feel like the breath of fresh air most of the world has been longing for since March. But for the time being, the coronavirus rages on, reaching new, record-breaking numbers of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths every day, which is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising against large gatherings this holiday season. So, while your annual New Year's Eve party may be out of the question, you and your quaranteam can still celebrate the new year in your own way, like throwing a taste-testing party complete with New Year's Eve food traditions from around the world. And though you may not believe that what you eat on Dec. 31 can play a part in the next year of your life, a little extra good fortune in 2021 can't hurt, and what better way to get that than by trying some of these lucky foods for the new year?

Before the clock strikes midnight on Dec. 31, people in Spain and Spanish-speaking countries around the world partake in a tradition called las doce uvas de la suerte, the 12 lucky grapes. The goal is to eat all 12 before midnight, if you want to have good luck in the new year, according to NPR.

According to CNN, Kransekage is a wreath cake tower that consists of multiple rings of cake piled on top of one another. The desserts are a part of Norway and Denmark's New Year's Eve traditions. The cake is made with marzipan, is often build around a bottle of wine or Aquavit in the center, and can be decorated for any special occasion.

The taste and ingredients of Tteokguk, a.k.a. Korea's New Year Soup, vary by region. But, generally, its base is made with a protein broth in a soy-sauce seasoned stock, then cylindrical rice cakes are added to the soup. According to the Culture Trip, Tteokguk is one of the many foods prepared as an offering to the family's ancestors on Seollal, the Korean New Year. It's said that someone cannot become a year older until they've had their bowl of tteokguk.

One of France's new year traditions actually takes place a few days after Jan. 1. According to France 24, a Paris-based news network, the galette des rois, or kings cake, is traditionally eaten on the first Sunday of the year to celebrate the Epiphany in Christianity. The cake is often made with puff pastry and frangipane, an almond-flavored cream or paste but they can be filled with plenty of other sweets instead. Regardless of its filling, the galette des rois always hides the coveted, fève, or bean, a ceramic trinket or charm, and the person who finds it is graced with good luck.

Tamales are a traditional Mexican dish made from corn dough stuffed with meat, cheese, and anything else you could possibly want, and then wrapped in a banana leaf or corn husk. Though tamales are eaten year-round and most special occasions, they take on a special meaning during the holiday season. CNN reported that families gather together to make tamales, assigning one aspect of the cooking process to each individual person. On New Year's tamales are served with menudo, a tripe and hominy soup.

These Dutch treats are made from frying small balls of dough stuffed with raisins or currants in a pan of hot oil, hence the name Oliebollen, or oil balls, the Dutch Review, a Netherlands magazine, reported. Known in the United States as Dutch Doughnuts, oliebollen are topped with powdered sugar and can be made with other ingredients, like cinnamon or apple pieces. The dessert is often eaten on New Year's Eve and washed down with champagne.

According to The Culture Trip, Kuku sabzi is type of frittata made with eggs and fresh herbs. The dish is traditionally served at Nowruz, the Iranian New Year, which takes place during the spring equinox. Kuku sabzi promises of fertility and abundance in the upcoming year.

The Bulgarian banitsa is one of the many round cakes eaten around the world on New Year's Eve. The shape signifies that the old year has come to and end, and the new year gives you a chance to start fresh, according to Bulgaria National Radio. The banitsa is traditionally made with filo pastry, eggs, and fat, but recipes vary in different parts of the country. Regardless of where you go, however, you'll always find twigs or other sticks placed inside the dish, each one representing well wishes for your relatives.

While this New Year's Eve food tradition doesn't involve eating, it is something that people in El Salvador do each year. A minute before midnight, each family member cracks an egg into a glass of water, The Culture Trip reported, and let them sit overnight. The following morning, the shape of the egg gives you a clue about what your future holds.

According to Latin media company we are mitú, the Roscas de Reyes, king's wreath, is a brioche-style cake, filled and topped with candied fruits. The cake is often paired with traditional Mexican hot chocolate, which highlights the indigenous origins of chocolate. Inside the Roscas, you'll find at least one, if not more, babies representing the newly born Jesus Christ.

In China, Japan and other Asian countries, it's customary to eat long noodles, which signify longevity, on New Year's Day and during the Lunar New Year, according to Washington Post. Since the noodles are never to be broken or shortened during the cooking process, the typical preparation for "Long-Life Noodles" is a stir-fry.


20 New Year's Food Traditions That'll Bring You Good Luck in 2021

People put their own spin on New Year's, but food is the one thing they have in common, and you'll want to try all of these lucky foods for the new year.

Around the world, people welcome a new year in different ways. From incomparable firework shows in Australia to water gun fights in the streets of Thailand, commemorating the new year comes in many ways, shapes, and forms. But one thing that all celebrations have in common? Food. Whether you're feasting on your favorite meal or munching on foods that'll bring you good luck in the new year, there are countless New Year's Eve food traditions that people follow worldwide in hopes of starting the next chapter of their lives on the right foot. Some traditions call for noodles, while others call for cakes, but regardless of how different the meals may be, in one way or another, most New Year's food traditions signify forward movement, prosperity, and health.

After a year like 2020 that's had so many heartbreaks, disappointments, and hardships, primarily due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, welcoming a new year is bound to feel even sweeter than usual. With newly introduced and approved vaccines on the horizon, 2021 can feel like the breath of fresh air most of the world has been longing for since March. But for the time being, the coronavirus rages on, reaching new, record-breaking numbers of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths every day, which is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising against large gatherings this holiday season. So, while your annual New Year's Eve party may be out of the question, you and your quaranteam can still celebrate the new year in your own way, like throwing a taste-testing party complete with New Year's Eve food traditions from around the world. And though you may not believe that what you eat on Dec. 31 can play a part in the next year of your life, a little extra good fortune in 2021 can't hurt, and what better way to get that than by trying some of these lucky foods for the new year?

Before the clock strikes midnight on Dec. 31, people in Spain and Spanish-speaking countries around the world partake in a tradition called las doce uvas de la suerte, the 12 lucky grapes. The goal is to eat all 12 before midnight, if you want to have good luck in the new year, according to NPR.

According to CNN, Kransekage is a wreath cake tower that consists of multiple rings of cake piled on top of one another. The desserts are a part of Norway and Denmark's New Year's Eve traditions. The cake is made with marzipan, is often build around a bottle of wine or Aquavit in the center, and can be decorated for any special occasion.

The taste and ingredients of Tteokguk, a.k.a. Korea's New Year Soup, vary by region. But, generally, its base is made with a protein broth in a soy-sauce seasoned stock, then cylindrical rice cakes are added to the soup. According to the Culture Trip, Tteokguk is one of the many foods prepared as an offering to the family's ancestors on Seollal, the Korean New Year. It's said that someone cannot become a year older until they've had their bowl of tteokguk.

One of France's new year traditions actually takes place a few days after Jan. 1. According to France 24, a Paris-based news network, the galette des rois, or kings cake, is traditionally eaten on the first Sunday of the year to celebrate the Epiphany in Christianity. The cake is often made with puff pastry and frangipane, an almond-flavored cream or paste but they can be filled with plenty of other sweets instead. Regardless of its filling, the galette des rois always hides the coveted, fève, or bean, a ceramic trinket or charm, and the person who finds it is graced with good luck.

Tamales are a traditional Mexican dish made from corn dough stuffed with meat, cheese, and anything else you could possibly want, and then wrapped in a banana leaf or corn husk. Though tamales are eaten year-round and most special occasions, they take on a special meaning during the holiday season. CNN reported that families gather together to make tamales, assigning one aspect of the cooking process to each individual person. On New Year's tamales are served with menudo, a tripe and hominy soup.

These Dutch treats are made from frying small balls of dough stuffed with raisins or currants in a pan of hot oil, hence the name Oliebollen, or oil balls, the Dutch Review, a Netherlands magazine, reported. Known in the United States as Dutch Doughnuts, oliebollen are topped with powdered sugar and can be made with other ingredients, like cinnamon or apple pieces. The dessert is often eaten on New Year's Eve and washed down with champagne.

According to The Culture Trip, Kuku sabzi is type of frittata made with eggs and fresh herbs. The dish is traditionally served at Nowruz, the Iranian New Year, which takes place during the spring equinox. Kuku sabzi promises of fertility and abundance in the upcoming year.

The Bulgarian banitsa is one of the many round cakes eaten around the world on New Year's Eve. The shape signifies that the old year has come to and end, and the new year gives you a chance to start fresh, according to Bulgaria National Radio. The banitsa is traditionally made with filo pastry, eggs, and fat, but recipes vary in different parts of the country. Regardless of where you go, however, you'll always find twigs or other sticks placed inside the dish, each one representing well wishes for your relatives.

While this New Year's Eve food tradition doesn't involve eating, it is something that people in El Salvador do each year. A minute before midnight, each family member cracks an egg into a glass of water, The Culture Trip reported, and let them sit overnight. The following morning, the shape of the egg gives you a clue about what your future holds.

According to Latin media company we are mitú, the Roscas de Reyes, king's wreath, is a brioche-style cake, filled and topped with candied fruits. The cake is often paired with traditional Mexican hot chocolate, which highlights the indigenous origins of chocolate. Inside the Roscas, you'll find at least one, if not more, babies representing the newly born Jesus Christ.

In China, Japan and other Asian countries, it's customary to eat long noodles, which signify longevity, on New Year's Day and during the Lunar New Year, according to Washington Post. Since the noodles are never to be broken or shortened during the cooking process, the typical preparation for "Long-Life Noodles" is a stir-fry.


20 New Year's Food Traditions That'll Bring You Good Luck in 2021

People put their own spin on New Year's, but food is the one thing they have in common, and you'll want to try all of these lucky foods for the new year.

Around the world, people welcome a new year in different ways. From incomparable firework shows in Australia to water gun fights in the streets of Thailand, commemorating the new year comes in many ways, shapes, and forms. But one thing that all celebrations have in common? Food. Whether you're feasting on your favorite meal or munching on foods that'll bring you good luck in the new year, there are countless New Year's Eve food traditions that people follow worldwide in hopes of starting the next chapter of their lives on the right foot. Some traditions call for noodles, while others call for cakes, but regardless of how different the meals may be, in one way or another, most New Year's food traditions signify forward movement, prosperity, and health.

After a year like 2020 that's had so many heartbreaks, disappointments, and hardships, primarily due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, welcoming a new year is bound to feel even sweeter than usual. With newly introduced and approved vaccines on the horizon, 2021 can feel like the breath of fresh air most of the world has been longing for since March. But for the time being, the coronavirus rages on, reaching new, record-breaking numbers of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths every day, which is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising against large gatherings this holiday season. So, while your annual New Year's Eve party may be out of the question, you and your quaranteam can still celebrate the new year in your own way, like throwing a taste-testing party complete with New Year's Eve food traditions from around the world. And though you may not believe that what you eat on Dec. 31 can play a part in the next year of your life, a little extra good fortune in 2021 can't hurt, and what better way to get that than by trying some of these lucky foods for the new year?

Before the clock strikes midnight on Dec. 31, people in Spain and Spanish-speaking countries around the world partake in a tradition called las doce uvas de la suerte, the 12 lucky grapes. The goal is to eat all 12 before midnight, if you want to have good luck in the new year, according to NPR.

According to CNN, Kransekage is a wreath cake tower that consists of multiple rings of cake piled on top of one another. The desserts are a part of Norway and Denmark's New Year's Eve traditions. The cake is made with marzipan, is often build around a bottle of wine or Aquavit in the center, and can be decorated for any special occasion.

The taste and ingredients of Tteokguk, a.k.a. Korea's New Year Soup, vary by region. But, generally, its base is made with a protein broth in a soy-sauce seasoned stock, then cylindrical rice cakes are added to the soup. According to the Culture Trip, Tteokguk is one of the many foods prepared as an offering to the family's ancestors on Seollal, the Korean New Year. It's said that someone cannot become a year older until they've had their bowl of tteokguk.

One of France's new year traditions actually takes place a few days after Jan. 1. According to France 24, a Paris-based news network, the galette des rois, or kings cake, is traditionally eaten on the first Sunday of the year to celebrate the Epiphany in Christianity. The cake is often made with puff pastry and frangipane, an almond-flavored cream or paste but they can be filled with plenty of other sweets instead. Regardless of its filling, the galette des rois always hides the coveted, fève, or bean, a ceramic trinket or charm, and the person who finds it is graced with good luck.

Tamales are a traditional Mexican dish made from corn dough stuffed with meat, cheese, and anything else you could possibly want, and then wrapped in a banana leaf or corn husk. Though tamales are eaten year-round and most special occasions, they take on a special meaning during the holiday season. CNN reported that families gather together to make tamales, assigning one aspect of the cooking process to each individual person. On New Year's tamales are served with menudo, a tripe and hominy soup.

These Dutch treats are made from frying small balls of dough stuffed with raisins or currants in a pan of hot oil, hence the name Oliebollen, or oil balls, the Dutch Review, a Netherlands magazine, reported. Known in the United States as Dutch Doughnuts, oliebollen are topped with powdered sugar and can be made with other ingredients, like cinnamon or apple pieces. The dessert is often eaten on New Year's Eve and washed down with champagne.

According to The Culture Trip, Kuku sabzi is type of frittata made with eggs and fresh herbs. The dish is traditionally served at Nowruz, the Iranian New Year, which takes place during the spring equinox. Kuku sabzi promises of fertility and abundance in the upcoming year.

The Bulgarian banitsa is one of the many round cakes eaten around the world on New Year's Eve. The shape signifies that the old year has come to and end, and the new year gives you a chance to start fresh, according to Bulgaria National Radio. The banitsa is traditionally made with filo pastry, eggs, and fat, but recipes vary in different parts of the country. Regardless of where you go, however, you'll always find twigs or other sticks placed inside the dish, each one representing well wishes for your relatives.

While this New Year's Eve food tradition doesn't involve eating, it is something that people in El Salvador do each year. A minute before midnight, each family member cracks an egg into a glass of water, The Culture Trip reported, and let them sit overnight. The following morning, the shape of the egg gives you a clue about what your future holds.

According to Latin media company we are mitú, the Roscas de Reyes, king's wreath, is a brioche-style cake, filled and topped with candied fruits. The cake is often paired with traditional Mexican hot chocolate, which highlights the indigenous origins of chocolate. Inside the Roscas, you'll find at least one, if not more, babies representing the newly born Jesus Christ.

In China, Japan and other Asian countries, it's customary to eat long noodles, which signify longevity, on New Year's Day and during the Lunar New Year, according to Washington Post. Since the noodles are never to be broken or shortened during the cooking process, the typical preparation for "Long-Life Noodles" is a stir-fry.