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Wendy’s Launches #Share4Adoption Campaign to Help Children in Foster Care

Wendy’s Launches #Share4Adoption Campaign to Help Children in Foster Care

Company to donate $5 for each social post, up to $500,000

Customers participate by completing the heart on the cup with their hand and posting on social media with the hashtag #Share4Adoption.

Wendy’s has brought back its #Share4Adoption campaign, which raises money and awareness to help foster children find families.

The fast food chain is serving drinks in specially designed cups featuring a hand making half of a heart. For every customer who completes the heart with his or her hand and posts the photo on social media with the hashtag #Share4Adoption, a $5 donation will be made to the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, up to a total of $500,000, according to a release.

Liliana Esposito, Wendy’s chief communications officer and trustee of the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, says, “Our #Share4Adoption campaign makes it incredibly easy to raise awareness for these children, which will ultimately help them get adopted. We are honored to serve the cause our founder was so passionate about and encourage everyone to join us in making hearts whole.”

Wendy’s founder Dave Thomas, a child of adoption himself, created the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption in 1992.

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This is how you could become a foster carer in Kent as council launches recruitment campaign

A couple who have fostered up to 70 children said they have "cherished every moment" of their "rewarding journey".

Wendy and Trevor Percival, who live off Old Road East, Gravesend, have spoken out as part of Kent County Council’s Foster Care Fortnight - a campaign to recruit 150 new carers for vulnerable children.

The pair are described as providing "the backbone" of Kent’s fostering community, which they have been a part of since 2002.

WATCH: Urgent appeal for more foster carers in Kent

Wendy, 51, who has two children aged 18 and 20 with escalator engineer Trevor, 61, said: "It's been a rewarding journey, despite the odd bump along the way.

"The whole family has learned a great deal and try to support our foster children through good times and bad.

"We have learnt about all sorts of disorders and problems children are either born with or developed in their short lives.

"With this ever-growing knowledge, the whole family try to help all of them to the best of our ability.

Wendy Percvial, 51, has fostered nearly 70 children

"Being about for their rough times, and upsets, but also understanding them, creating good times, and having fun when we can."

Since 2018, the number of children under the care of Kent County Council (KCC) has fallen by just under 150 to 1,600, with around three quarters in foster care.

Despite more than 80 families, couples and single people taking the plunge, many more foster carers are still needed.

Wendy added: "I think the most rewarding thing is when a child who has left comes back as an adult, telling you how everything you taught them, or they gained from living with you, helped shaped their future.

"I always say to every child when they arrive, you may not be blood relatives, but now you are part of our family."

Foster carers can look after young people long-term, or offer short-break respite care for children with disabilities.

Kent Fostering is also developing a new "Hub Family Scheme" where foster carer families are linked to nearby children in care, to be there as extra support to the child's main placement.


This is how you could become a foster carer in Kent as council launches recruitment campaign

A couple who have fostered up to 70 children said they have "cherished every moment" of their "rewarding journey".

Wendy and Trevor Percival, who live off Old Road East, Gravesend, have spoken out as part of Kent County Council’s Foster Care Fortnight - a campaign to recruit 150 new carers for vulnerable children.

The pair are described as providing "the backbone" of Kent’s fostering community, which they have been a part of since 2002.

WATCH: Urgent appeal for more foster carers in Kent

Wendy, 51, who has two children aged 18 and 20 with escalator engineer Trevor, 61, said: "It's been a rewarding journey, despite the odd bump along the way.

"The whole family has learned a great deal and try to support our foster children through good times and bad.

"We have learnt about all sorts of disorders and problems children are either born with or developed in their short lives.

"With this ever-growing knowledge, the whole family try to help all of them to the best of our ability.

Wendy Percvial, 51, has fostered nearly 70 children

"Being about for their rough times, and upsets, but also understanding them, creating good times, and having fun when we can."

Since 2018, the number of children under the care of Kent County Council (KCC) has fallen by just under 150 to 1,600, with around three quarters in foster care.

Despite more than 80 families, couples and single people taking the plunge, many more foster carers are still needed.

Wendy added: "I think the most rewarding thing is when a child who has left comes back as an adult, telling you how everything you taught them, or they gained from living with you, helped shaped their future.

"I always say to every child when they arrive, you may not be blood relatives, but now you are part of our family."

Foster carers can look after young people long-term, or offer short-break respite care for children with disabilities.

Kent Fostering is also developing a new "Hub Family Scheme" where foster carer families are linked to nearby children in care, to be there as extra support to the child's main placement.


This is how you could become a foster carer in Kent as council launches recruitment campaign

A couple who have fostered up to 70 children said they have "cherished every moment" of their "rewarding journey".

Wendy and Trevor Percival, who live off Old Road East, Gravesend, have spoken out as part of Kent County Council’s Foster Care Fortnight - a campaign to recruit 150 new carers for vulnerable children.

The pair are described as providing "the backbone" of Kent’s fostering community, which they have been a part of since 2002.

WATCH: Urgent appeal for more foster carers in Kent

Wendy, 51, who has two children aged 18 and 20 with escalator engineer Trevor, 61, said: "It's been a rewarding journey, despite the odd bump along the way.

"The whole family has learned a great deal and try to support our foster children through good times and bad.

"We have learnt about all sorts of disorders and problems children are either born with or developed in their short lives.

"With this ever-growing knowledge, the whole family try to help all of them to the best of our ability.

Wendy Percvial, 51, has fostered nearly 70 children

"Being about for their rough times, and upsets, but also understanding them, creating good times, and having fun when we can."

Since 2018, the number of children under the care of Kent County Council (KCC) has fallen by just under 150 to 1,600, with around three quarters in foster care.

Despite more than 80 families, couples and single people taking the plunge, many more foster carers are still needed.

Wendy added: "I think the most rewarding thing is when a child who has left comes back as an adult, telling you how everything you taught them, or they gained from living with you, helped shaped their future.

"I always say to every child when they arrive, you may not be blood relatives, but now you are part of our family."

Foster carers can look after young people long-term, or offer short-break respite care for children with disabilities.

Kent Fostering is also developing a new "Hub Family Scheme" where foster carer families are linked to nearby children in care, to be there as extra support to the child's main placement.


This is how you could become a foster carer in Kent as council launches recruitment campaign

A couple who have fostered up to 70 children said they have "cherished every moment" of their "rewarding journey".

Wendy and Trevor Percival, who live off Old Road East, Gravesend, have spoken out as part of Kent County Council’s Foster Care Fortnight - a campaign to recruit 150 new carers for vulnerable children.

The pair are described as providing "the backbone" of Kent’s fostering community, which they have been a part of since 2002.

WATCH: Urgent appeal for more foster carers in Kent

Wendy, 51, who has two children aged 18 and 20 with escalator engineer Trevor, 61, said: "It's been a rewarding journey, despite the odd bump along the way.

"The whole family has learned a great deal and try to support our foster children through good times and bad.

"We have learnt about all sorts of disorders and problems children are either born with or developed in their short lives.

"With this ever-growing knowledge, the whole family try to help all of them to the best of our ability.

Wendy Percvial, 51, has fostered nearly 70 children

"Being about for their rough times, and upsets, but also understanding them, creating good times, and having fun when we can."

Since 2018, the number of children under the care of Kent County Council (KCC) has fallen by just under 150 to 1,600, with around three quarters in foster care.

Despite more than 80 families, couples and single people taking the plunge, many more foster carers are still needed.

Wendy added: "I think the most rewarding thing is when a child who has left comes back as an adult, telling you how everything you taught them, or they gained from living with you, helped shaped their future.

"I always say to every child when they arrive, you may not be blood relatives, but now you are part of our family."

Foster carers can look after young people long-term, or offer short-break respite care for children with disabilities.

Kent Fostering is also developing a new "Hub Family Scheme" where foster carer families are linked to nearby children in care, to be there as extra support to the child's main placement.


This is how you could become a foster carer in Kent as council launches recruitment campaign

A couple who have fostered up to 70 children said they have "cherished every moment" of their "rewarding journey".

Wendy and Trevor Percival, who live off Old Road East, Gravesend, have spoken out as part of Kent County Council’s Foster Care Fortnight - a campaign to recruit 150 new carers for vulnerable children.

The pair are described as providing "the backbone" of Kent’s fostering community, which they have been a part of since 2002.

WATCH: Urgent appeal for more foster carers in Kent

Wendy, 51, who has two children aged 18 and 20 with escalator engineer Trevor, 61, said: "It's been a rewarding journey, despite the odd bump along the way.

"The whole family has learned a great deal and try to support our foster children through good times and bad.

"We have learnt about all sorts of disorders and problems children are either born with or developed in their short lives.

"With this ever-growing knowledge, the whole family try to help all of them to the best of our ability.

Wendy Percvial, 51, has fostered nearly 70 children

"Being about for their rough times, and upsets, but also understanding them, creating good times, and having fun when we can."

Since 2018, the number of children under the care of Kent County Council (KCC) has fallen by just under 150 to 1,600, with around three quarters in foster care.

Despite more than 80 families, couples and single people taking the plunge, many more foster carers are still needed.

Wendy added: "I think the most rewarding thing is when a child who has left comes back as an adult, telling you how everything you taught them, or they gained from living with you, helped shaped their future.

"I always say to every child when they arrive, you may not be blood relatives, but now you are part of our family."

Foster carers can look after young people long-term, or offer short-break respite care for children with disabilities.

Kent Fostering is also developing a new "Hub Family Scheme" where foster carer families are linked to nearby children in care, to be there as extra support to the child's main placement.


This is how you could become a foster carer in Kent as council launches recruitment campaign

A couple who have fostered up to 70 children said they have "cherished every moment" of their "rewarding journey".

Wendy and Trevor Percival, who live off Old Road East, Gravesend, have spoken out as part of Kent County Council’s Foster Care Fortnight - a campaign to recruit 150 new carers for vulnerable children.

The pair are described as providing "the backbone" of Kent’s fostering community, which they have been a part of since 2002.

WATCH: Urgent appeal for more foster carers in Kent

Wendy, 51, who has two children aged 18 and 20 with escalator engineer Trevor, 61, said: "It's been a rewarding journey, despite the odd bump along the way.

"The whole family has learned a great deal and try to support our foster children through good times and bad.

"We have learnt about all sorts of disorders and problems children are either born with or developed in their short lives.

"With this ever-growing knowledge, the whole family try to help all of them to the best of our ability.

Wendy Percvial, 51, has fostered nearly 70 children

"Being about for their rough times, and upsets, but also understanding them, creating good times, and having fun when we can."

Since 2018, the number of children under the care of Kent County Council (KCC) has fallen by just under 150 to 1,600, with around three quarters in foster care.

Despite more than 80 families, couples and single people taking the plunge, many more foster carers are still needed.

Wendy added: "I think the most rewarding thing is when a child who has left comes back as an adult, telling you how everything you taught them, or they gained from living with you, helped shaped their future.

"I always say to every child when they arrive, you may not be blood relatives, but now you are part of our family."

Foster carers can look after young people long-term, or offer short-break respite care for children with disabilities.

Kent Fostering is also developing a new "Hub Family Scheme" where foster carer families are linked to nearby children in care, to be there as extra support to the child's main placement.


This is how you could become a foster carer in Kent as council launches recruitment campaign

A couple who have fostered up to 70 children said they have "cherished every moment" of their "rewarding journey".

Wendy and Trevor Percival, who live off Old Road East, Gravesend, have spoken out as part of Kent County Council’s Foster Care Fortnight - a campaign to recruit 150 new carers for vulnerable children.

The pair are described as providing "the backbone" of Kent’s fostering community, which they have been a part of since 2002.

WATCH: Urgent appeal for more foster carers in Kent

Wendy, 51, who has two children aged 18 and 20 with escalator engineer Trevor, 61, said: "It's been a rewarding journey, despite the odd bump along the way.

"The whole family has learned a great deal and try to support our foster children through good times and bad.

"We have learnt about all sorts of disorders and problems children are either born with or developed in their short lives.

"With this ever-growing knowledge, the whole family try to help all of them to the best of our ability.

Wendy Percvial, 51, has fostered nearly 70 children

"Being about for their rough times, and upsets, but also understanding them, creating good times, and having fun when we can."

Since 2018, the number of children under the care of Kent County Council (KCC) has fallen by just under 150 to 1,600, with around three quarters in foster care.

Despite more than 80 families, couples and single people taking the plunge, many more foster carers are still needed.

Wendy added: "I think the most rewarding thing is when a child who has left comes back as an adult, telling you how everything you taught them, or they gained from living with you, helped shaped their future.

"I always say to every child when they arrive, you may not be blood relatives, but now you are part of our family."

Foster carers can look after young people long-term, or offer short-break respite care for children with disabilities.

Kent Fostering is also developing a new "Hub Family Scheme" where foster carer families are linked to nearby children in care, to be there as extra support to the child's main placement.


This is how you could become a foster carer in Kent as council launches recruitment campaign

A couple who have fostered up to 70 children said they have "cherished every moment" of their "rewarding journey".

Wendy and Trevor Percival, who live off Old Road East, Gravesend, have spoken out as part of Kent County Council’s Foster Care Fortnight - a campaign to recruit 150 new carers for vulnerable children.

The pair are described as providing "the backbone" of Kent’s fostering community, which they have been a part of since 2002.

WATCH: Urgent appeal for more foster carers in Kent

Wendy, 51, who has two children aged 18 and 20 with escalator engineer Trevor, 61, said: "It's been a rewarding journey, despite the odd bump along the way.

"The whole family has learned a great deal and try to support our foster children through good times and bad.

"We have learnt about all sorts of disorders and problems children are either born with or developed in their short lives.

"With this ever-growing knowledge, the whole family try to help all of them to the best of our ability.

Wendy Percvial, 51, has fostered nearly 70 children

"Being about for their rough times, and upsets, but also understanding them, creating good times, and having fun when we can."

Since 2018, the number of children under the care of Kent County Council (KCC) has fallen by just under 150 to 1,600, with around three quarters in foster care.

Despite more than 80 families, couples and single people taking the plunge, many more foster carers are still needed.

Wendy added: "I think the most rewarding thing is when a child who has left comes back as an adult, telling you how everything you taught them, or they gained from living with you, helped shaped their future.

"I always say to every child when they arrive, you may not be blood relatives, but now you are part of our family."

Foster carers can look after young people long-term, or offer short-break respite care for children with disabilities.

Kent Fostering is also developing a new "Hub Family Scheme" where foster carer families are linked to nearby children in care, to be there as extra support to the child's main placement.


This is how you could become a foster carer in Kent as council launches recruitment campaign

A couple who have fostered up to 70 children said they have "cherished every moment" of their "rewarding journey".

Wendy and Trevor Percival, who live off Old Road East, Gravesend, have spoken out as part of Kent County Council’s Foster Care Fortnight - a campaign to recruit 150 new carers for vulnerable children.

The pair are described as providing "the backbone" of Kent’s fostering community, which they have been a part of since 2002.

WATCH: Urgent appeal for more foster carers in Kent

Wendy, 51, who has two children aged 18 and 20 with escalator engineer Trevor, 61, said: "It's been a rewarding journey, despite the odd bump along the way.

"The whole family has learned a great deal and try to support our foster children through good times and bad.

"We have learnt about all sorts of disorders and problems children are either born with or developed in their short lives.

"With this ever-growing knowledge, the whole family try to help all of them to the best of our ability.

Wendy Percvial, 51, has fostered nearly 70 children

"Being about for their rough times, and upsets, but also understanding them, creating good times, and having fun when we can."

Since 2018, the number of children under the care of Kent County Council (KCC) has fallen by just under 150 to 1,600, with around three quarters in foster care.

Despite more than 80 families, couples and single people taking the plunge, many more foster carers are still needed.

Wendy added: "I think the most rewarding thing is when a child who has left comes back as an adult, telling you how everything you taught them, or they gained from living with you, helped shaped their future.

"I always say to every child when they arrive, you may not be blood relatives, but now you are part of our family."

Foster carers can look after young people long-term, or offer short-break respite care for children with disabilities.

Kent Fostering is also developing a new "Hub Family Scheme" where foster carer families are linked to nearby children in care, to be there as extra support to the child's main placement.


This is how you could become a foster carer in Kent as council launches recruitment campaign

A couple who have fostered up to 70 children said they have "cherished every moment" of their "rewarding journey".

Wendy and Trevor Percival, who live off Old Road East, Gravesend, have spoken out as part of Kent County Council’s Foster Care Fortnight - a campaign to recruit 150 new carers for vulnerable children.

The pair are described as providing "the backbone" of Kent’s fostering community, which they have been a part of since 2002.

WATCH: Urgent appeal for more foster carers in Kent

Wendy, 51, who has two children aged 18 and 20 with escalator engineer Trevor, 61, said: "It's been a rewarding journey, despite the odd bump along the way.

"The whole family has learned a great deal and try to support our foster children through good times and bad.

"We have learnt about all sorts of disorders and problems children are either born with or developed in their short lives.

"With this ever-growing knowledge, the whole family try to help all of them to the best of our ability.

Wendy Percvial, 51, has fostered nearly 70 children

"Being about for their rough times, and upsets, but also understanding them, creating good times, and having fun when we can."

Since 2018, the number of children under the care of Kent County Council (KCC) has fallen by just under 150 to 1,600, with around three quarters in foster care.

Despite more than 80 families, couples and single people taking the plunge, many more foster carers are still needed.

Wendy added: "I think the most rewarding thing is when a child who has left comes back as an adult, telling you how everything you taught them, or they gained from living with you, helped shaped their future.

"I always say to every child when they arrive, you may not be blood relatives, but now you are part of our family."

Foster carers can look after young people long-term, or offer short-break respite care for children with disabilities.

Kent Fostering is also developing a new "Hub Family Scheme" where foster carer families are linked to nearby children in care, to be there as extra support to the child's main placement.